Discussion:
OT Series: John Lennon made pact with S8n, says new book
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H8N S8N
2009-05-15 14:22:52 UTC
Permalink
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=97837

Posted: May 14, 2009
8:20 pm Eastern

© 2009 WorldNetDaily





WASHINGTON – The Beatles meteoric rise, unprecedented in popular
culture and unrivaled nearly four decades after the band broke up, is
at least partly explained, says a new book, by a pact John Lennon made
with the Devil.

In "The Lennon Prophecy," author Joseph Niezgoda reveals that Lennon
himself, obsessed with the occult, magic, numerology and being bigger
than Elvis Presley, confided in his friend Tony Sheridan that he made
such a deal. The book also makes the case that the "death clues" long
associated with Paul McCartney were actually subliminal messages
hinting at Lennon's fate.

Written by a lifelong Beatles fan and musician, the book hypothesizes
the pact was made just before the band experienced its first major
successes and ended 20 years later with Lennon's assassination in New
York by Mark David Chapman, who later claimed to have demons exorcized
from him while serving his sentence for murder in Attica State Prison.

"Chapman said that as the last demon left his body he was given the
reason for his possession," Niezgoda told WND. "It was to make a show
of Satan's great power in the world using John Lennon's murder as the
vehicle. I've always held an intuitive belief … that the true author
of this story is Satan and that I am only the messenger."

Get the book that lays out the case for John Lennon's pact with Satan
– "The Lennon Prophecy" by Joseph Niezgoda.

Of course, many will reject the notion that there is a real spirit
called Satan. Others will scoff at the notion that people can make
pacts with him that can result in real-world results.

So Niezgoda devotes a chapter to what may surprise many readers as
fairly well-documented historical Satanic pacts – including the case
of Johann Faust, who, in his Renaissance Age period, achieved fame and
fortune perhaps equal to Lennon and the Beatles four centuries later.
He, too, met an untimely, mysterious and grotesquely inexplicable
death 20 years later.

While Faust boasted of performing more miracles than Jesus Christ,
Lennon created controversy by boasting that his band was more famous
than Jesus Christ.



"If John had entered into a 20-year pact with the Devil for wealth and
world fame, that contract ended on December 8, 1980, with his violent
death," said Niezgoda. "Counting back 20 years, did anything unusual
in Beatles history occur in December 1960?"

In fact, it did, Niezgoda recalls. On Dec. 27, 1960, the Beatles
played the Town Hall Ball Room in Litherland, England.

"It was said that following this single night's performance, the
Beatles never looked back," recalls Niezgoda. "Each of the Beatles
remembers this night as the turning point in their careers."

Immediately following this memorable performance, the Beatles began
playing in Liverpool's Cavern Club, where they became a local
phenomenon. Then they moved on to Hamburg, where German audiences went
wild.

That gig also marked the beginning of Lennon's avowedly anti-Christian
behavior. In the book "The Love You Make" by Peter Brown, he recounts
how Lennon donned a dog collar made of paper, cut out a paper cross
and began preaching to the Hamburg audience – drawing a mocking
picture of Jesus hanging on the cross wearing a pair of bedroom
slippers.

Later, also in Germany, on Good Friday, Lennon targeted a group of
nuns with a life-size effigy of Jesus on the cross hanging from his
balcony.

"As the sisters gazed in astonishment at this sacrilegious display,
John started pelting them with Durex condoms filled with water," wrote
biographer Albert Goldman.

Pete Best, the original drummer with the group, also witnessed such
behavior and wrote about it in his own book describing how Lennon
urinated on another group of nuns from his balcony while proclaiming,
"Raindrops from heaven!"

These were just some of the ways Lennon confronted and antagonized
Christian worshippers – for seemingly no reason other than his own
amusement.

The book devotes a full chapter to Lennon's childhood of tragedy,
disappointment and sadness. His mother, Julia, and his father,
Freddie, fought over custody of young John. At 5 years old, he was
forced to decide which parent he would choose. He first chose his
father. But when his mother asked him if he was sure, he ran to her.

"John never forgot the horror of that incident," writes Niezgoda. "It
left a permanent scar and great feelings of insecurity, and nearly 20
years would pass before he would see his father again."

Life with Julia Lennon was no bargain. He was often left home alone
and found it difficult to sleep. Lennon later recalled that she was
"not prostituting for money but rather for silk stockings."

At age 6, Lennon began running away from home to stay with his Aunt
Mimi. He learned which trolleys to take by the quality of the black
leather seats, he explained.

"To this day, I'm fond of black leather," he would say later. "I find
it comforting."

Sometimes he would be picked up by adults concerned for his welfare
and taken to a local police station.

"I could never find the right words to explain my situation," he would
say.

Lennon's troubles continued through schooling – taking little interest
in classroom learning, showing contempt for teachers, skipping class,
smoking and swearing, cheating on exams, stealing candy from other
children and pilfering cigarettes to make money.

He was thrown out of religious chorus for substituting obscene words
in hymns.

Another biographer wrote: "John regularly poked fun at church
dignitaries, parodied hymns and drew blasphemous cartoons of Christ on
the cross in a way that only the once-faithful can."

Perhaps to compensate for his tough childhood, Lennon became consumed
with becoming both rich and famous.

Pete Best recalled how Lennon would say he was going to get to the top
– one way or another.

"If we have to be bent or con people, then that's what we'll have to
do to get there," Best quoted Lennon as saying. "It doesn't matter
what it takes to get to the top. It might cause some heartache, but
once I'm up there, it'll be a different kettle of fish. Yes, he did
say, 'I' and not 'we.' That was the real John Lennon, brilliant,
amusing but ruthless."

Niezgoda cites the unprecedented and unsurpassed "mania" that
surrounded the Beatles as one of the most intriguing clues suggesting
something supernatural about their career.

"John, Paul, George and Ringo were highly talented writers and
musicians – as all too well evidenced by their solo careers," Niezgoda
told WND. "But what was it at the beginning that set them apart from
their contemporaries? What was it that lifted them in a few short
years from utter obscurity to become the greatest show on Earth. When
they traveled to Australia in 1964, what earthly power caused 400,000
fans to gather outside their hotel to merely catch a glimpse of the
four young boys from Liverpool? How does one logically account for 20
number one hit records in a brief period of six years?

"Nothing before or since has come close to equaling the rapid and
widespread emotional pandemic frenzy surrounding the Beatles. I can go
on indefinitely listing their unearthly accomplishments but that is
not providing an explanation for it. Trying to explain the source of
the Beatles fame and fortune is like trying to define magic."

At the peak of their popularity, Beatles fans became obsessed with
what appeared to be clues in their music about a death within the
band. At the time, the focus was on speculation that McCartney had
been killed in a car crash and replaced with a lookalike.

Not even a press conference by Paul could persuade devotees of the
clues that he was, in fact, the real deal. It all seemed silly after
McCartney's long and illustrious solo career took off.

"The suspicion, however, was not without merit," explains Niezgoda.
"The clues were there, and too numerous to be ignored. They just
needed to be viewed through a different lens to create not a picture
of a past conspiracy, but a future tragedy. When examined as a
possible prophecy, the clues appear to be quite clearly not about
Paul, but about John Lennon."

Niezgoda is convinced the Beatles had supernatural help – not only
with their rise to the top, but with these "clues" that seemed so
persuasive that something was not right within the Beatles. He's not
happy about his conclusion. In fact, as a lifelong Beatles fan, he
seems deeply conflicted.

"I have always had to deal with the constant conflict of my love for
their music and the evil that I perceive surrounds it," he told WND.
"The only difference is that I have tried to define or make sense of
it with the help of this book."

H8n note:
I am not saying I agree or disagree here.
Just posting the story
Papillon
2009-05-15 16:41:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by H8N S8N
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=97837
Posted: May 14, 2009
8:20 pm Eastern
© 2009 WorldNetDaily
WASHINGTON – The Beatles meteoric rise, unprecedented in popular
culture and unrivaled nearly four decades after the band broke up, is
at least partly explained, says a new book, by a pact John Lennon made
with the Devil.
In "The Lennon Prophecy," author Joseph Niezgoda reveals that Lennon
himself, obsessed with the occult, magic, numerology and being bigger
than Elvis Presley, confided in his friend Tony Sheridan that he made
such a deal. The book also makes the case that the "death clues" long
associated with Paul McCartney were actually subliminal messages
hinting at Lennon's fate.
Written by a lifelong Beatles fan and musician, the book hypothesizes
the pact was made just before the band experienced its first major
successes and ended 20 years later with Lennon's assassination in New
York by Mark David Chapman, who later claimed to have demons exorcized
from him while serving his sentence for murder in Attica State Prison.
"Chapman said that as the last demon left his body he was given the
reason for his possession," Niezgoda told WND. "It was to make a show
of Satan's great power in the world using John Lennon's murder as the
vehicle. I've always held an intuitive belief … that the true author
of this story is Satan and that I am only the messenger."
Get the book that lays out the case for John Lennon's pact with Satan
– "The Lennon Prophecy" by Joseph Niezgoda.
Of course, many will reject the notion that there is a real spirit
called Satan. Others will scoff at the notion that people can make
pacts with him that can result in real-world results.
So Niezgoda devotes a chapter to what may surprise many readers as
fairly well-documented historical Satanic pacts – including the case
of Johann Faust, who, in his Renaissance Age period, achieved fame and
fortune perhaps equal to Lennon and the Beatles four centuries later.
He, too, met an untimely, mysterious and grotesquely inexplicable
death 20 years later.
While Faust boasted of performing more miracles than Jesus Christ,
Lennon created controversy by boasting that his band was more famous
than Jesus Christ.
"If John had entered into a 20-year pact with the Devil for wealth and
world fame, that contract ended on December 8, 1980, with his violent
death," said Niezgoda. "Counting back 20 years, did anything unusual
in Beatles history occur in December 1960?"
In fact, it did, Niezgoda recalls. On Dec. 27, 1960, the Beatles
played the Town Hall Ball Room in Litherland, England.
"It was said that following this single night's performance, the
Beatles never looked back," recalls Niezgoda. "Each of the Beatles
remembers this night as the turning point in their careers."
Immediately following this memorable performance, the Beatles began
playing in Liverpool's Cavern Club, where they became a local
phenomenon. Then they moved on to Hamburg, where German audiences went
wild.
That gig also marked the beginning of Lennon's avowedly anti-Christian
behavior. In the book "The Love You Make" by Peter Brown, he recounts
how Lennon donned a dog collar made of paper, cut out a paper cross
and began preaching to the Hamburg audience – drawing a mocking
picture of Jesus hanging on the cross wearing a pair of bedroom
slippers.
Later, also in Germany, on Good Friday, Lennon targeted a group of
nuns with a life-size effigy of Jesus on the cross hanging from his
balcony.
"As the sisters gazed in astonishment at this sacrilegious display,
biographer Albert Goldman.
Pete Best, the original drummer with the group, also witnessed such
behavior and wrote about it in his own book describing how Lennon
urinated on another group of nuns from his balcony while proclaiming,
"Raindrops from heaven!"
These were just some of the ways Lennon confronted and antagonized
Christian worshippers – for seemingly no reason other than his own
amusement.
The book devotes a full chapter to Lennon's childhood of tragedy,
disappointment and sadness. His mother, Julia, and his father,
Freddie, fought over custody of young John. At 5 years old, he was
forced to decide which parent he would choose. He first chose his
father. But when his mother asked him if he was sure, he ran to her.
"John never forgot the horror of that incident," writes Niezgoda. "It
left a permanent scar and great feelings of insecurity, and nearly 20
years would pass before he would see his father again."
Life with Julia Lennon was no bargain. He was often left home alone
and found it difficult to sleep. Lennon later recalled that she was
"not prostituting for money but rather for silk stockings."
At age 6, Lennon began running away from home to stay with his Aunt
Mimi. He learned which trolleys to take by the quality of the black
leather seats, he explained.
"To this day, I'm fond of black leather," he would say later. "I find
it comforting."
Sometimes he would be picked up by adults concerned for his welfare
and taken to a local police station.
"I could never find the right words to explain my situation," he would
say.
Lennon's troubles continued through schooling – taking little interest
in classroom learning, showing contempt for teachers, skipping class,
smoking and swearing, cheating on exams, stealing candy from other
children and pilfering cigarettes to make money.
He was thrown out of religious chorus for substituting obscene words
in hymns.
Another biographer wrote: "John regularly poked fun at church
dignitaries, parodied hymns and drew blasphemous cartoons of Christ on
the cross in a way that only the once-faithful can."
Perhaps to compensate for his tough childhood, Lennon became consumed
with becoming both rich and famous.
Pete Best recalled how Lennon would say he was going to get to the top
– one way or another.
"If we have to be bent or con people, then that's what we'll have to
do to get there," Best quoted Lennon as saying. "It doesn't matter
what it takes to get to the top. It might cause some heartache, but
once I'm up there, it'll be a different kettle of fish. Yes, he did
say, 'I' and not 'we.' That was the real John Lennon, brilliant,
amusing but ruthless."
Niezgoda cites the unprecedented and unsurpassed "mania" that
surrounded the Beatles as one of the most intriguing clues suggesting
something supernatural about their career.
"John, Paul, George and Ringo were highly talented writers and
musicians – as all too well evidenced by their solo careers," Niezgoda
told WND. "But what was it at the beginning that set them apart from
their contemporaries? What was it that lifted them in a few short
years from utter obscurity to become the greatest show on Earth. When
they traveled to Australia in 1964, what earthly power caused 400,000
fans to gather outside their hotel to merely catch a glimpse of the
four young boys from Liverpool? How does one logically account for 20
number one hit records in a brief period of six years?
"Nothing before or since has come close to equaling the rapid and
widespread emotional pandemic frenzy surrounding the Beatles. I can go
on indefinitely listing their unearthly accomplishments but that is
not providing an explanation for it. Trying to explain the source of
the Beatles fame and fortune is like trying to define magic."
At the peak of their popularity, Beatles fans became obsessed with
what appeared to be clues in their music about a death within the
band. At the time, the focus was on speculation that McCartney had
been killed in a car crash and replaced with a lookalike.
Not even a press conference by Paul could persuade devotees of the
clues that he was, in fact, the real deal. It all seemed silly after
McCartney's long and illustrious solo career took off.
"The suspicion, however, was not without merit," explains Niezgoda.
"The clues were there, and too numerous to be ignored. They just
needed to be viewed through a different lens to create not a picture
of a past conspiracy, but a future tragedy. When examined as a
possible prophecy, the clues appear to be quite clearly not about
Paul, but about John Lennon."
Niezgoda is convinced the Beatles had supernatural help – not only
with their rise to the top, but with these "clues" that seemed so
persuasive that something was not right within the Beatles. He's not
happy about his conclusion. In fact, as a lifelong Beatles fan, he
seems deeply conflicted.
"I have always had to deal with the constant conflict of my love for
their music and the evil that I perceive surrounds it," he told WND.
"The only difference is that I have tried to define or make sense of
it with the help of this book."
I am not saying I agree or disagree here.
Just posting the story
If nothing else it is certainly an interesting story.
matt2442
2009-05-15 21:58:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by H8N S8N
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=97837
Posted: May 14, 2009
8:20 pm Eastern
© 2009 WorldNetDaily
WASHINGTON – The Beatles meteoric rise, unprecedented in popular
culture and unrivaled nearly four decades after the band broke up, is
at least partly explained, says a new book, by a pact John Lennon made
with the Devil.
In "The Lennon Prophecy," author Joseph Niezgoda reveals that Lennon
himself, obsessed with the occult, magic, numerology and being bigger
than Elvis Presley, confided in his friend Tony Sheridan that he made
such a deal. The book also makes the case that the "death clues" long
associated with Paul McCartney were actually subliminal messages
hinting at Lennon's fate.
Written by a lifelong Beatles fan and musician, the book hypothesizes
the pact was made just before the band experienced its first major
successes and ended 20 years later with Lennon's assassination in New
York by Mark David Chapman, who later claimed to have demons exorcized
from him while serving his sentence for murder in Attica State Prison.
"Chapman said that as the last demon left his body he was given the
reason for his possession," Niezgoda told WND. "It was to make a show
of Satan's great power in the world using John Lennon's murder as the
vehicle. I've always held an intuitive belief … that the true author
of this story is Satan and that I am only the messenger."
Get the book that lays out the case for John Lennon's pact with Satan
– "The Lennon Prophecy" by Joseph Niezgoda.
Of course, many will reject the notion that there is a real spirit
called Satan. Others will scoff at the notion that people can make
pacts with him that can result in real-world results.
So Niezgoda devotes a chapter to what may surprise many readers as
fairly well-documented historical Satanic pacts – including the case
of Johann Faust, who, in his Renaissance Age period, achieved fame and
fortune perhaps equal to Lennon and the Beatles four centuries later.
He, too, met an untimely, mysterious and grotesquely inexplicable
death 20 years later.
While Faust boasted of performing more miracles than Jesus Christ,
Lennon created controversy by boasting that his band was more famous
than Jesus Christ.
"If John had entered into a 20-year pact with the Devil for wealth and
world fame, that contract ended on December 8, 1980, with his violent
death," said Niezgoda. "Counting back 20 years, did anything unusual
in Beatles history occur in December 1960?"
In fact, it did, Niezgoda recalls. On Dec. 27, 1960, the Beatles
played the Town Hall Ball Room in Litherland, England.
"It was said that following this single night's performance, the
Beatles never looked back," recalls Niezgoda. "Each of the Beatles
remembers this night as the turning point in their careers."
Immediately following this memorable performance, the Beatles began
playing in Liverpool's Cavern Club, where they became a local
phenomenon. Then they moved on to Hamburg, where German audiences went
wild.
That gig also marked the beginning of Lennon's avowedly anti-Christian
behavior. In the book "The Love You Make" by Peter Brown, he recounts
how Lennon donned a dog collar made of paper, cut out a paper cross
and began preaching to the Hamburg audience – drawing a mocking
picture of Jesus hanging on the cross wearing a pair of bedroom
slippers.
Later, also in Germany, on Good Friday, Lennon targeted a group of
nuns with a life-size effigy of Jesus on the cross hanging from his
balcony.
"As the sisters gazed in astonishment at this sacrilegious display,
biographer Albert Goldman.
Pete Best, the original drummer with the group, also witnessed such
behavior and wrote about it in his own book describing how Lennon
urinated on another group of nuns from his balcony while proclaiming,
"Raindrops from heaven!"
These were just some of the ways Lennon confronted and antagonized
Christian worshippers – for seemingly no reason other than his own
amusement.
The book devotes a full chapter to Lennon's childhood of tragedy,
disappointment and sadness. His mother, Julia, and his father,
Freddie, fought over custody of young John. At 5 years old, he was
forced to decide which parent he would choose. He first chose his
father. But when his mother asked him if he was sure, he ran to her.
"John never forgot the horror of that incident," writes Niezgoda. "It
left a permanent scar and great feelings of insecurity, and nearly 20
years would pass before he would see his father again."
Life with Julia Lennon was no bargain. He was often left home alone
and found it difficult to sleep. Lennon later recalled that she was
"not prostituting for money but rather for silk stockings."
At age 6, Lennon began running away from home to stay with his Aunt
Mimi. He learned which trolleys to take by the quality of the black
leather seats, he explained.
"To this day, I'm fond of black leather," he would say later. "I find
it comforting."
Sometimes he would be picked up by adults concerned for his welfare
and taken to a local police station.
"I could never find the right words to explain my situation," he would
say.
Lennon's troubles continued through schooling – taking little interest
in classroom learning, showing contempt for teachers, skipping class,
smoking and swearing, cheating on exams, stealing candy from other
children and pilfering cigarettes to make money.
He was thrown out of religious chorus for substituting obscene words
in hymns.
Another biographer wrote: "John regularly poked fun at church
dignitaries, parodied hymns and drew blasphemous cartoons of Christ on
the cross in a way that only the once-faithful can."
Perhaps to compensate for his tough childhood, Lennon became consumed
with becoming both rich and famous.
Pete Best recalled how Lennon would say he was going to get to the top
– one way or another.
"If we have to be bent or con people, then that's what we'll have to
do to get there," Best quoted Lennon as saying. "It doesn't matter
what it takes to get to the top. It might cause some heartache, but
once I'm up there, it'll be a different kettle of fish. Yes, he did
say, 'I' and not 'we.' That was the real John Lennon, brilliant,
amusing but ruthless."
Niezgoda cites the unprecedented and unsurpassed "mania" that
surrounded the Beatles as one of the most intriguing clues suggesting
something supernatural about their career.
"John, Paul, George and Ringo were highly talented writers and
musicians – as all too well evidenced by their solo careers," Niezgoda
told WND. "But what was it at the beginning that set them apart from
their contemporaries? What was it that lifted them in a few short
years from utter obscurity to become the greatest show on Earth. When
they traveled to Australia in 1964, what earthly power caused 400,000
fans to gather outside their hotel to merely catch a glimpse of the
four young boys from Liverpool? How does one logically account for 20
number one hit records in a brief period of six years?
"Nothing before or since has come close to equaling the rapid and
widespread emotional pandemic frenzy surrounding the Beatles. I can go
on indefinitely listing their unearthly accomplishments but that is
not providing an explanation for it. Trying to explain the source of
the Beatles fame and fortune is like trying to define magic."
At the peak of their popularity, Beatles fans became obsessed with
what appeared to be clues in their music about a death within the
band. At the time, the focus was on speculation that McCartney had
been killed in a car crash and replaced with a lookalike.
Not even a press conference by Paul could persuade devotees of the
clues that he was, in fact, the real deal. It all seemed silly after
McCartney's long and illustrious solo career took off.
"The suspicion, however, was not without merit," explains Niezgoda.
"The clues were there, and too numerous to be ignored. They just
needed to be viewed through a different lens to create not a picture
of a past conspiracy, but a future tragedy. When examined as a
possible prophecy, the clues appear to be quite clearly not about
Paul, but about John Lennon."
Niezgoda is convinced the Beatles had supernatural help – not only
with their rise to the top, but with these "clues" that seemed so
persuasive that something was not right within the Beatles. He's not
happy about his conclusion. In fact, as a lifelong Beatles fan, he
seems deeply conflicted.
"I have always had to deal with the constant conflict of my love for
their music and the evil that I perceive surrounds it," he told WND.
"The only difference is that I have tried to define or make sense of
it with the help of this book."
I am not saying I agree or disagree here.
Just posting the story
If nothing else it is certainly an interesting story.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Matt2442:
Nothing entirely new either. I've seen "Rock and Roll Sorcerers of the
New Age" and I think there's another onre called "Hell's Bells" or
"They Sold Their Souls for Rock and Roll" or something like that which
supposedly document that just about everyone you can think of from
Elvis to more recent artists have all been heavily into the teachings
of Aleister Crowley and have sold their souls to the devil to make it
big in music. The bottom line in all of these is to tell us that we
should not listen to this "evil rock and roll music."
Papillon
2009-05-15 23:37:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by matt2442
Post by H8N S8N
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=97837
Posted: May 14, 2009
8:20 pm Eastern
© 2009 WorldNetDaily
WASHINGTON – The Beatles meteoric rise, unprecedented in popular
culture and unrivaled nearly four decades after the band broke up, is
at least partly explained, says a new book, by a pact John Lennon made
with the Devil.
In "The Lennon Prophecy," author Joseph Niezgoda reveals that Lennon
himself, obsessed with the occult, magic, numerology and being bigger
than Elvis Presley, confided in his friend Tony Sheridan that he made
such a deal. The book also makes the case that the "death clues" long
associated with Paul McCartney were actually subliminal messages
hinting at Lennon's fate.
Written by a lifelong Beatles fan and musician, the book hypothesizes
the pact was made just before the band experienced its first major
successes and ended 20 years later with Lennon's assassination in New
York by Mark David Chapman, who later claimed to have demons exorcized
from him while serving his sentence for murder in Attica State Prison.
"Chapman said that as the last demon left his body he was given the
reason for his possession," Niezgoda told WND. "It was to make a show
of Satan's great power in the world using John Lennon's murder as the
vehicle. I've always held an intuitive belief … that the true author
of this story is Satan and that I am only the messenger."
Get the book that lays out the case for John Lennon's pact with Satan
– "The Lennon Prophecy" by Joseph Niezgoda.
Of course, many will reject the notion that there is a real spirit
called Satan. Others will scoff at the notion that people can make
pacts with him that can result in real-world results.
So Niezgoda devotes a chapter to what may surprise many readers as
fairly well-documented historical Satanic pacts – including the case
of Johann Faust, who, in his Renaissance Age period, achieved fame and
fortune perhaps equal to Lennon and the Beatles four centuries later.
He, too, met an untimely, mysterious and grotesquely inexplicable
death 20 years later.
While Faust boasted of performing more miracles than Jesus Christ,
Lennon created controversy by boasting that his band was more famous
than Jesus Christ.
"If John had entered into a 20-year pact with the Devil for wealth and
world fame, that contract ended on December 8, 1980, with his violent
death," said Niezgoda. "Counting back 20 years, did anything unusual
in Beatles history occur in December 1960?"
In fact, it did, Niezgoda recalls. On Dec. 27, 1960, the Beatles
played the Town Hall Ball Room in Litherland, England.
"It was said that following this single night's performance, the
Beatles never looked back," recalls Niezgoda. "Each of the Beatles
remembers this night as the turning point in their careers."
Immediately following this memorable performance, the Beatles began
playing in Liverpool's Cavern Club, where they became a local
phenomenon. Then they moved on to Hamburg, where German audiences went
wild.
That gig also marked the beginning of Lennon's avowedly anti-Christian
behavior. In the book "The Love You Make" by Peter Brown, he recounts
how Lennon donned a dog collar made of paper, cut out a paper cross
and began preaching to the Hamburg audience – drawing a mocking
picture of Jesus hanging on the cross wearing a pair of bedroom
slippers.
Later, also in Germany, on Good Friday, Lennon targeted a group of
nuns with a life-size effigy of Jesus on the cross hanging from his
balcony.
"As the sisters gazed in astonishment at this sacrilegious display,
biographer Albert Goldman.
Pete Best, the original drummer with the group, also witnessed such
behavior and wrote about it in his own book describing how Lennon
urinated on another group of nuns from his balcony while proclaiming,
"Raindrops from heaven!"
These were just some of the ways Lennon confronted and antagonized
Christian worshippers – for seemingly no reason other than his own
amusement.
The book devotes a full chapter to Lennon's childhood of tragedy,
disappointment and sadness. His mother, Julia, and his father,
Freddie, fought over custody of young John. At 5 years old, he was
forced to decide which parent he would choose. He first chose his
father. But when his mother asked him if he was sure, he ran to her.
"John never forgot the horror of that incident," writes Niezgoda. "It
left a permanent scar and great feelings of insecurity, and nearly 20
years would pass before he would see his father again."
Life with Julia Lennon was no bargain. He was often left home alone
and found it difficult to sleep. Lennon later recalled that she was
"not prostituting for money but rather for silk stockings."
At age 6, Lennon began running away from home to stay with his Aunt
Mimi. He learned which trolleys to take by the quality of the black
leather seats, he explained.
"To this day, I'm fond of black leather," he would say later. "I find
it comforting."
Sometimes he would be picked up by adults concerned for his welfare
and taken to a local police station.
"I could never find the right words to explain my situation," he would
say.
Lennon's troubles continued through schooling – taking little interest
in classroom learning, showing contempt for teachers, skipping class,
smoking and swearing, cheating on exams, stealing candy from other
children and pilfering cigarettes to make money.
He was thrown out of religious chorus for substituting obscene words
in hymns.
Another biographer wrote: "John regularly poked fun at church
dignitaries, parodied hymns and drew blasphemous cartoons of Christ on
the cross in a way that only the once-faithful can."
Perhaps to compensate for his tough childhood, Lennon became consumed
with becoming both rich and famous.
Pete Best recalled how Lennon would say he was going to get to the top
– one way or another.
"If we have to be bent or con people, then that's what we'll have to
do to get there," Best quoted Lennon as saying. "It doesn't matter
what it takes to get to the top. It might cause some heartache, but
once I'm up there, it'll be a different kettle of fish. Yes, he did
say, 'I' and not 'we.' That was the real John Lennon, brilliant,
amusing but ruthless."
Niezgoda cites the unprecedented and unsurpassed "mania" that
surrounded the Beatles as one of the most intriguing clues suggesting
something supernatural about their career.
"John, Paul, George and Ringo were highly talented writers and
musicians – as all too well evidenced by their solo careers," Niezgoda
told WND. "But what was it at the beginning that set them apart from
their contemporaries? What was it that lifted them in a few short
years from utter obscurity to become the greatest show on Earth. When
they traveled to Australia in 1964, what earthly power caused 400,000
fans to gather outside their hotel to merely catch a glimpse of the
four young boys from Liverpool? How does one logically account for 20
number one hit records in a brief period of six years?
"Nothing before or since has come close to equaling the rapid and
widespread emotional pandemic frenzy surrounding the Beatles. I can go
on indefinitely listing their unearthly accomplishments but that is
not providing an explanation for it. Trying to explain the source of
the Beatles fame and fortune is like trying to define magic."
At the peak of their popularity, Beatles fans became obsessed with
what appeared to be clues in their music about a death within the
band. At the time, the focus was on speculation that McCartney had
been killed in a car crash and replaced with a lookalike.
Not even a press conference by Paul could persuade devotees of the
clues that he was, in fact, the real deal. It all seemed silly after
McCartney's long and illustrious solo career took off.
"The suspicion, however, was not without merit," explains Niezgoda.
"The clues were there, and too numerous to be ignored. They just
needed to be viewed through a different lens to create not a picture
of a past conspiracy, but a future tragedy. When examined as a
possible prophecy, the clues appear to be quite clearly not about
Paul, but about John Lennon."
Niezgoda is convinced the Beatles had supernatural help – not only
with their rise to the top, but with these "clues" that seemed so
persuasive that something was not right within the Beatles. He's not
happy about his conclusion. In fact, as a lifelong Beatles fan, he
seems deeply conflicted.
"I have always had to deal with the constant conflict of my love for
their music and the evil that I perceive surrounds it," he told WND.
"The only difference is that I have tried to define or make sense of
it with the help of this book."
I am not saying I agree or disagree here.
Just posting the story
If nothing else it is certainly an interesting story.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Nothing entirely new either. I've seen "Rock and Roll Sorcerers of the
New Age" and I think there's another onre called "Hell's Bells" or
"They Sold Their Souls for Rock and Roll" or something like that which
supposedly document that just about everyone you can think of from
Elvis to more recent artists have all been heavily into the teachings
of Aleister Crowley and have sold their souls to the devil to make it
big in music. The bottom line in all of these is to tell us that we
should not listen to this "evil rock and roll music."
I know a lot of people who threw away their albums when they became
Christians. Of course as they matured in the faith they wished they'd
not acted so rashly.
Weatherman
2009-05-16 02:27:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Papillon
I know a lot of people who threw away their albums when they became
Christians. Of course as they matured in the faith they wished they'd
not acted so rashly.
WM-I did that and it was probably what needed to be done at the time.

Looking back at most of what I got rid of, even today, it belonged in
the trash can.
Papillon
2009-05-16 06:41:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by Papillon
I know a lot of people who threw away their albums when they became
Christians. Of course as they matured in the faith they wished they'd
not acted so rashly.
WM-I did that and it was probably what needed to be done at the time.
Looking back at most of what I got rid of, even today, it belonged in
the trash can.
So you're telling us you have really bad taste in music? Hehe.
Weatherman
2009-05-16 10:03:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by Papillon
I know a lot of people who threw away their albums when they became
Christians. Of course as they matured in the faith they wished they'd
not acted so rashly.
WM-I did that and it was probably what needed to be done at the time.
Looking back at most of what I got rid of, even today, it belonged in
the trash can.
So you're telling us you have really bad taste in music?  Hehe.
WM-Yea maybe. It had to do with hard rock and the pointlessness of the
drug/rock culture immersion. The life style and all that hard music
not only started to drive me crazy but the entire emptiness and
cheapness it all turned out to be left me felling rather disgusted. So
I tossed the vast majority of the lifestyle and the associated things
in an effort to find some grounding in sanity and Christ. Cold
turkey.

I was a baptist and got on the anti rock kick, was a young christian.
Cant say that I was involved with an anti rock pastor or anything just
did it myself. In fact my pastor thought I was going overboard.

Now I know some of you strong and well adjusted young Christians that
never had a traumatic break form anything being so well rounded and
level headed are so proud of yourselves but you may never have had to
take on a sort of wrestling for your soul. That condition alone for a
young inexperienced warrior can result in a slash and burn approach to
things in your life. Now I could use other language to describe all of
this but we are in mixed company here and it never pays to be totally
open outside of others that have shared some of the same experiences.
matt2442
2009-05-16 18:05:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
WM-Yea maybe. It had to do with hard rock and the pointlessness of the
drug/rock culture immersion. The life style and all that hard music
not only started to drive me crazy but the entire emptiness and
cheapness it all turned out to be left me felling rather disgusted. So
I tossed the vast majority of the lifestyle and the associated things
in an effort to find some grounding in sanity and Christ. Cold
turkey.
I was a baptist and got on the anti rock kick, was a young christian.
Cant say that I was involved with an anti rock pastor or anything just
did it myself. In fact my pastor thought I was going overboard.
Now I know some of you strong and well adjusted young Christians that
never had a traumatic break form anything being so well rounded and
level headed are so proud of yourselves but you may never have had to
take on a sort of wrestling for your soul. That condition alone for a
young inexperienced warrior can result in a slash and burn approach to
things in your life. Now I could use other language to describe all of
this but we are in mixed company here and it never pays to be totally
open outside of others that have shared some of the same experiences.
Matt2442:
I don't feel proud that I didn't burn my music. I can recall some
struggle with the same music you are talking about shortly after high
school. I had not gone so far as to completely give my life to Christ
yet, but I remember passing on free tickets to an AC/DC concert in
1982, and it was mainly over some of their lyrics (highway to hell,
hell ain't a bad place to be, etc.) that was disturbing to me for some
reason at the time. Just a couple of years earlier I'd have been all
over free AC/DC tickets. I can also recall a Black Sabbath concert
with Ronnie James Dio at the same period of time, where he said
something to the audience about "I'm going to burn in Hell, with ALL
OF YOU!!!" The response was loud cheering as if this were a good
thing. I was high as a kite, but pretty sure I did not want to go to
hell.
If I had any pride about not burning my music at the time, I remeber
that Gene Scott's church was full of such people, and look where we
were...with GENE SCOTT. I've often wondered if it would have been
beneficial for a time to go through a sort of legalistic bootcamp for
a period of time, ultimately to experience God's Grace, and learn of
the liberty we have in Christ as the Holy Spirit revealed it to me,
rather that jumping head first into Gene Scott's version of liberty in
Christ.
Papillon
2009-05-16 19:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by matt2442
Post by Weatherman
WM-Yea maybe. It had to do with hard rock and the pointlessness of the
drug/rock culture immersion. The life style and all that hard music
not only started to drive me crazy but the entire emptiness and
cheapness it all turned out to be left me felling rather disgusted. So
I tossed the vast majority of the lifestyle and the associated things
in an effort to find some grounding in sanity and Christ. Cold
turkey.
I was a baptist and got on the anti rock kick, was a young christian.
Cant say that I was involved with an anti rock pastor or anything just
did it myself. In fact my pastor thought I was going overboard.
Now I know some of you strong and well adjusted young Christians that
never had a traumatic break form anything being so well rounded and
level headed are so proud of yourselves but you may never have had to
take on a sort of wrestling for your soul. That condition alone for a
young inexperienced warrior can result in a slash and burn approach to
things in your life. Now I could use other language to describe all of
this but we are in mixed company here and it never pays to be totally
open outside of others that have shared some of the same experiences.
I don't feel proud that I didn't burn my music. I can recall some
struggle with the same music you are talking about shortly after high
school. I had not gone so far as to completely give my life to Christ
yet, but I remember passing on free tickets to an AC/DC concert in
1982, and it was mainly over some of their lyrics (highway to hell,
hell ain't a bad place to be, etc.) that was disturbing to me for some
reason at the time. Just a couple of years earlier I'd have been all
over free AC/DC tickets. I can also recall a Black Sabbath concert
with Ronnie James Dio at the same period of time, where he said
something to the audience about "I'm going to burn in Hell, with ALL
OF YOU!!!" The response was loud cheering as if this were a good
thing. I was high as a kite, but pretty sure I did not want to go to
hell.
If I had any pride about not burning my music at the time, I remeber
that Gene Scott's church was full of such people, and look where we
were...with GENE SCOTT. I've often wondered if it would have been
beneficial for a time to go through a sort of legalistic bootcamp for
a period of time, ultimately to experience God's Grace, and learn of
the liberty we have in Christ as the Holy Spirit revealed it to me,
rather that jumping head first into Gene Scott's version of liberty in
Christ.
Hmmm... I am kind of, well not proud. but happy for not destroying my
albums. It is one area in which I didn't turn in to a total dick in
my youthful days as a member of the Church.
matt2442
2009-05-16 20:15:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Papillon
Hmmm... I am kind of, well not proud. but happy for not destroying my
albums.  It is one area in which I didn't turn in to a total dick in
my youthful days as a member of the Church.
Matt2442:
Well it's one thing if you burn your records, it's another thing
entirely if you demand it of others to prove to you that they love
Jesus. I remember my friend Claude in High School who got saved one
summer. Not only did he destroy his own records, but he burned his
brother's records as well, and became the kind of obnoxious new
convert that really irritates even other christians.
Weatherman
2009-05-16 22:28:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by matt2442
Post by Papillon
Hmmm... I am kind of, well not proud. but happy for not destroying my
albums.  It is one area in which I didn't turn in to a total dick in
my youthful days as a member of the Church.
Well it's one thing if you burn your records, it's another thing
entirely if you demand it of others to prove to you that they love
Jesus. I remember my friend Claude in High School who got saved one
summer. Not only did he destroy his own records, but he burned his
brother's records as well, and became the kind of obnoxious new
convert that really irritates even other christians.
WM-Yea that was me. Burn them or hit the road. I was all of 18 and
coming down off a major stone man. Looking back so much to do
shouldn't have been made over nothing. Maybe.

I was burning my AC/DC albums about the same time Bond Scott was
dieing. True story. What are the odds? Have always felt guilty about
it for some reason to tell you the truth.

Saw a black mass in my brothers room, Black Sabbath guy, one of the
albums was out at the time. Saw Butler on tv talking about the band
seeing a black figure in the studio from time to time and how it
scared the crap out of him. That was years after but once hearing that
I though could it have been the same spirit? Anyway I burnt that
album. My brother didn't seem to mind much becouse he had seen things
and so had my mom. And I knew nothing really about what was being said
in christian circles about rock music.

So you see there was more to it than just being a legalistic ass hole
on a kick.

I knew some guys down the road that were heavy BS guys and drug users.
One ODed, another killed himself becouse he got high and caused a fire
in the house that killed another brother. Always the god dammed Black
Sabbath in the background. Them and some others, Step'in Wolf, BS,
cult following. Almost all of them ended up in life's shit can.

Anyway to escape, who cares what it looks like just get the blank OUT
friend.

Reminds me of Gideon tearing down the stupid foreign stone god and
grove his dumbass father had. "Whats wrong with your son man? Dickhead
should chill out. We're gong to kill that stupid religious bastard. He
better get over himself self righteous prick."
matt2442
2009-05-16 23:29:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
WM-Yea that was me. Burn them or hit the road. I was all of 18 and
coming down off a major stone man. Looking back so much to do
shouldn't have been made over nothing. Maybe.
I was burning my AC/DC albums about the same time Bond Scott was
dieing. True story. What are the odds? Have always felt guilty about
it for some reason to tell you the truth.
Saw a black mass in my brothers room, Black Sabbath guy, one of the
albums was out at the time. Saw Butler on tv talking about the band
seeing a black figure in the studio from time to time and how it
scared the crap out of him. That was years after but once hearing that
I though could it have been the same spirit? Anyway I burnt that
album. My brother didn't seem to mind much becouse he had seen things
and so had my mom. And I knew nothing really about what was being said
in christian circles about rock music.
So you see there was more to it than just being a legalistic ass hole
on a kick.
I knew some guys down the road that were heavy BS guys and drug users.
One ODed, another killed himself becouse he got high and caused a fire
in the house that killed another brother. Always the god dammed Black
Sabbath in the background. Them and some others, Step'in Wolf, BS,
cult following. Almost all of them ended up in life's shit can.
Anyway to escape, who cares what it looks like just get the blank OUT
friend.
Reminds me of Gideon tearing down the stupid foreign stone god and
grove his dumbass father had. "Whats wrong with your son man? Dickhead
should chill out. We're gong to kill that stupid religious bastard. He
better get over himself self righteous prick."
Matt2442:
I have no problem with you burning your records, especially for the
reasons you have said. I don't feel superior to anyone else because I
didn't get rid of mine, though I probably did when I was in Scott's
church. I don't, though I may still have an AC/DC and a couple of
Black Sabbath records in my collection, ever really pull them out to
listen.
Black Sabbath was my first concert when I was 13, and I was quite into
them for a couple of years, then I just got burned out on them as I
discovered other bands I liked a lot better.
b***@hotmail.com
2009-05-17 00:30:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by matt2442
Post by Weatherman
WM-Yea that was me. Burn them or hit the road. I was all of 18 and
coming down off a major stone man. Looking back so much to do
shouldn't have been made over nothing. Maybe.
I was burning my AC/DC albums about the same time Bond Scott was
dieing. True story. What are the odds? Have always felt guilty about
it for some reason to tell you the truth.
Saw a black mass in my brothers room, Black Sabbath guy, one of the
albums was out at the time. Saw Butler on tv talking about the band
seeing a black figure in the studio from time to time and how it
scared the crap out of him. That was years after but once hearing that
I though could it have been the same spirit? Anyway I burnt that
album. My brother didn't seem to mind much becouse he had seen things
and so had my mom. And I knew nothing really about what was being said
in christian circles about rock music.
So you see there was more to it than just being a legalistic ass hole
on a kick.
I knew some guys down the road that were heavy BS guys and drug users.
One ODed, another killed himself becouse he got high and caused a fire
in the house that killed another brother. Always the god dammed Black
Sabbath in the background. Them and some others, Step'in Wolf, BS,
cult following. Almost all of them ended up in life's shit can.
Anyway to escape, who cares what it looks like just get the blank OUT
friend.
Reminds me of Gideon tearing down the stupid foreign stone god and
grove his dumbass father had. "Whats wrong with your son man? Dickhead
should chill out. We're gong to kill that stupid religious bastard. He
better get over himself self righteous prick."
I have no problem with you burning your records, especially for the
reasons you have said. I don't feel superior to anyone else because I
didn't get rid of mine, though I probably did when I was in Scott's
church. I don't, though I may still have an AC/DC and a couple of
Black Sabbath records in my collection, ever really pull them out to
listen.
Black Sabbath was my first concert when I was 13, and I was quite into
them for a couple of years, then I just got burned out on them as I
discovered other bands I liked a lot better.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
rpbc:
Hmmm.... listening to my double disc Jimmy Buffet album, a live
recording named, appropriately, "You Had To Be There", roughly
1977.... lots of good time hedonistic rock and rolling southern
flavored music..... A Pirate Looks At Forty, Come Monday, He Went to
Paris, MIss You So Badly, The Captain And The Kid, Wonder Why We Ever
Go Home, Margaritaville...... still sounds good. So does Neil
Diamond's 'Hot August Night'. So does the Who's 'Who's Next' and
It's A Beautiful Day's 'Merrying Maiden', not to mention Waylon
Jenning's 'Love of the Common People'. The Doors album play well
too... especially the first two, kind of dark but it's largely what
one brings to it.... it's okay to observe while totally listening. I
think AC/DC's Highyway to Hell, totally experienced but no angry
embrace, is a good lesson in totally destructive turns one can make
with their life.

You make the burning of your records totally understood WM. I get
what you are saying. I've seen the affects of music and complimentary
lifestyle provide a future different than one available to some
otherwise gifted young people minus mentoring..... skate boarder
mentality and the thrasher music one example.... drugs and Quicksilver
Messenger Service another..... 'Imagine', one more.
Weatherman
2009-05-17 01:09:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Post by matt2442
Post by Weatherman
WM-Yea that was me. Burn them or hit the road. I was all of 18 and
coming down off a major stone man. Looking back so much to do
shouldn't have been made over nothing. Maybe.
I was burning my AC/DC albums about the same time Bond Scott was
dieing. True story. What are the odds? Have always felt guilty about
it for some reason to tell you the truth.
Saw a black mass in my brothers room, Black Sabbath guy, one of the
albums was out at the time. Saw Butler on tv talking about the band
seeing a black figure in the studio from time to time and how it
scared the crap out of him. That was years after but once hearing that
I though could it have been the same spirit? Anyway I burnt that
album. My brother didn't seem to mind much becouse he had seen things
and so had my mom. And I knew nothing really about what was being said
in christian circles about rock music.
So you see there was more to it than just being a legalistic ass hole
on a kick.
I knew some guys down the road that were heavy BS guys and drug users.
One ODed, another killed himself becouse he got high and caused a fire
in the house that killed another brother. Always the god dammed Black
Sabbath in the background. Them and some others, Step'in Wolf, BS,
cult following. Almost all of them ended up in life's shit can.
Anyway to escape, who cares what it looks like just get the blank OUT
friend.
Reminds me of Gideon tearing down the stupid foreign stone god and
grove his dumbass father had. "Whats wrong with your son man? Dickhead
should chill out. We're gong to kill that stupid religious bastard. He
better get over himself self righteous prick."
I have no problem with you burning your records, especially for the
reasons you have said. I don't feel superior to anyone else because I
didn't get rid of mine, though I probably did when I was in Scott's
church. I don't, though I may still have an AC/DC and a couple of
Black Sabbath records in my collection, ever really pull them out to
listen.
Black Sabbath was my first concert when I was 13, and I was quite into
them for a couple of years, then I just got burned out on them as I
discovered other bands I liked a lot better.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Hmmm.... listening to my double disc Jimmy Buffet album, a live
recording named, appropriately, "You Had To Be There", roughly
1977.... lots of good time hedonistic rock and rolling southern
flavored music..... A Pirate Looks At Forty, Come Monday, He Went to
Paris, MIss You So Badly, The Captain And The Kid, Wonder Why We Ever
Go Home, Margaritaville...... still sounds good.   So does Neil
Diamond's 'Hot August Night'.   So does the Who's 'Who's Next' and
It's A Beautiful Day's 'Merrying Maiden', not to mention Waylon
Jenning's 'Love of the Common People'.   The Doors album play well
too... especially the first two, kind of dark but it's largely what
one brings to it.... it's okay to observe while totally listening.   I
think AC/DC's Highyway to Hell, totally experienced but no angry
embrace, is a good lesson in totally destructive turns one can make
with their life.
You make the burning of your records totally understood WM.  I get
what you are saying.  I've seen the affects of music and complimentary
lifestyle provide a future different than one available to some
otherwise gifted young people minus mentoring..... skate boarder
mentality and the thrasher music one example.... drugs and Quicksilver
Messenger Service another..... 'Imagine', one more.
WM- Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger service...you been there man.

Once I got better grounded I went back and hung out a bit with some of
my old buddies that had a good band by that time but they were
uncomfortable to say the least no matter what.

My son got some Led Zep- How the West was won the other day from the
library. He really likes their 3rd album and I never told him that it
was a favorite of mine as well back in the day. Anyway I didn't have a
blow out and in fact have let him indulge in my new collection. He
enjoys Tool as well.

In fact i have even written some "rock" music after all that blow out
period.
studio
2009-05-17 05:27:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Post by matt2442
Post by Weatherman
WM-Yea that was me. Burn them or hit the road. I was all of 18 and
coming down off a major stone man. Looking back so much to do
shouldn't have been made over nothing. Maybe.
I was burning my AC/DC albums about the same time Bond Scott was
dieing. True story. What are the odds? Have always felt guilty about
it for some reason to tell you the truth.
Saw a black mass in my brothers room, Black Sabbath guy, one of the
albums was out at the time. Saw Butler on tv talking about the band
seeing a black figure in the studio from time to time and how it
scared the crap out of him. That was years after but once hearing that
I though could it have been the same spirit? Anyway I burnt that
album. My brother didn't seem to mind much becouse he had seen things
and so had my mom. And I knew nothing really about what was being said
in christian circles about rock music.
So you see there was more to it than just being a legalistic ass hole
on a kick.
I knew some guys down the road that were heavy BS guys and drug users.
One ODed, another killed himself becouse he got high and caused a fire
in the house that killed another brother. Always the god dammed Black
Sabbath in the background. Them and some others, Step'in Wolf, BS,
cult following. Almost all of them ended up in life's shit can.
Anyway to escape, who cares what it looks like just get the blank OUT
friend.
Reminds me of Gideon tearing down the stupid foreign stone god and
grove his dumbass father had. "Whats wrong with your son man? Dickhead
should chill out. We're gong to kill that stupid religious bastard. He
better get over himself self righteous prick."
I have no problem with you burning your records, especially for the
reasons you have said. I don't feel superior to anyone else because I
didn't get rid of mine, though I probably did when I was in Scott's
church. I don't, though I may still have an AC/DC and a couple of
Black Sabbath records in my collection, ever really pull them out to
listen.
Black Sabbath was my first concert when I was 13, and I was quite into
them for a couple of years, then I just got burned out on them as I
discovered other bands I liked a lot better.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Hmmm.... listening to my double disc Jimmy Buffet album, a live
recording named, appropriately, "You Had To Be There", roughly
1977.... lots of good time hedonistic rock and rolling southern
flavored music..... A Pirate Looks At Forty, Come Monday, He Went to
Paris, MIss You So Badly, The Captain And The Kid, Wonder Why We Ever
Go Home, Margaritaville...... still sounds good.   So does Neil
Diamond's 'Hot August Night'.   So does the Who's 'Who's Next' and
It's A Beautiful Day's 'Merrying Maiden', not to mention Waylon
Jenning's 'Love of the Common People'.   The Doors album play well
too... especially the first two, kind of dark but it's largely what
one brings to it.... it's okay to observe while totally listening.   I
think AC/DC's Highyway to Hell, totally experienced but no angry
embrace, is a good lesson in totally destructive turns one can make
with their life.
You make the burning of your records totally understood WM.  I get
what you are saying.  I've seen the affects of music and complimentary
lifestyle provide a future different than one available to some
otherwise gifted young people minus mentoring..... skate boarder
mentality and the thrasher music one example.... drugs and Quicksilver
Messenger Service another..... 'Imagine', one more.
WM- Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger service...you been there man.
Once I got better grounded I went back and hung out a bit with some of
my old buddies that had a good band by that time but they were
uncomfortable to say the least no matter what.
My son got some Led Zep- How the West was won the other day from the
library. He really likes their 3rd album and I never told him that it
was a favorite of mine as well back in the day. Anyway I didn't have a
blow out and in fact have let him indulge in my new collection. He
enjoys Tool as well.
In fact i have even written some "rock" music after all that blow out
period.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
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.
.
.
.
studio wrote:


Zep's 3rd album is still my favorite!

I went to San Diego last week, a two hour drive
and I put on the third album while doing 80 mph.
Awesome songs and sound.

I'm a big believer in being able to distinguish
a recording dipped in the black arts and maybe
one that isn't to an extent.

Even one bad seed in a band can affect the
entire vibe of an album or group.

The thing about Jimmy Page is his allegiance
to Crowley as oppossed to a more modern
L. Ron Hubbard and The S cult.

They both (Crowley and Hubbard) worshipped
the same antichrist entity, but it was Crowley
who wanted to do so in a subservient manner.
Whereas Hubbard was more into gainning the
power for himself and the prosperity that went
with it. Two different approaches totally.

The spirit behind the Jimmy Page ordeal is
the one that brings masses together under
a common umbrella. Thus we have the
Zep phenomena.

I don't quite believe John Lennon has any such
undertaking in his closet. No gohanzens of
The Beast 666 or anything like that. I think his
biggest spiritual influence was his tragic youth
and the death of his mother at an early age
before he even got a chance to formulate any
important questions for her.

So does he have a reason to be angry at the church
or at God? I suppose it could happen to anyone
with tragic circumstances in their life. Some people
never recover and others may become overachievers.

There's no real demarcation line and you don't know if you've
never been in that position.

john Lennon's Imagine song is just ONE song in hundreds
that he has written. To define or judge his entire being
on one such scribble of words and simple chord structure
would be silly at best.

'You may say I'm a dreamer..." No, I say you're a Capitalist
that chooses the right words to sell millions of songs.

"Imagine there's no Heaven, it's easy if you can.
Nothing to live or die for.........." Well, it seems kind clear
he's hinting at the agnostic stance of most if not all war
is caused by some religious faction against another.

I doubt if only for the shock factor, that he meant for everyone
to throw away any notion of a Creator.

There's plenty of other songs that are "Devil Anthems".
Some more blatant that others. Check out the list of
musicians that follow Sri Chinmoy.
b***@hotmail.com
2009-05-17 17:48:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Hmmm.... listening to my double disc Jimmy Buffet album, a live
recording named, appropriately, "You Had To Be There", roughly
1977.... lots of good time hedonistic rock and rolling southern
flavored music..... A Pirate Looks At Forty, Come Monday, He Went to
Paris, MIss You So Badly, The Captain And The Kid, Wonder Why We Ever
Go Home, Margaritaville...... still sounds good.   So does Neil
Diamond's 'Hot August Night'.   So does the Who's 'Who's Next' and
It's A Beautiful Day's 'Merrying Maiden', not to mention Waylon
Jenning's 'Love of the Common People'.   The Doors album play well
too... especially the first two, kind of dark but it's largely what
one brings to it.... it's okay to observe while totally listening.   I
think AC/DC's Highyway to Hell, totally experienced but no angry
embrace, is a good lesson in totally destructive turns one can make
with their life.
You make the burning of your records totally understood WM.  I get
what you are saying.  I've seen the affects of music and complimentary
lifestyle provide a future different than one available to some
otherwise gifted young people minus mentoring..... skate boarder
mentality and the thrasher music one example.... drugs and Quicksilver
Messenger Service another..... 'Imagine', one more.
WM- Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger service...you been there man.
Once I got better grounded I went back and hung out a bit with some of
my old buddies that had a good band by that time but they were
uncomfortable to say the least no matter what.
My son got some Led Zep- How the West was won the other day from the
library. He really likes their 3rd album and I never told him that it
was a favorite of mine as well back in the day. Anyway I didn't have a
blow out and in fact have let him indulge in my new collection. He
enjoys Tool as well.
In fact i have even written some "rock" music after all that blow out
period.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
rpbc:
Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger Service... no, I wasn't there doing
that, just there.. the straight one hanging out, no one knew.

All things as building blocks, rock music as it evolved certainly is a
stepping stone available to the devil but it takes real refinement to
make good use of it for benefit of hell. Here's an example of what I
consider to be the devils building with trades of higher skill,
building on 'Imagine'..........


----------------------------------------------------------------

Former fundamentalist 'debunks' Bible
Story Highlights
Meet a real-life "Angels & Demons" professor

Biblical scholar says most of New Testament is a forgery

Scholar's work gains audience skeptical of church

Scholar's mom no longer talks to him about his books

By John Blake
CNN
CNN -- Just so you know, Bart Ehrman says he's not the anti-Christ.

He says he's not trying to destroy your faith. He's not trying to bash
the Bible. And, though his mother no longer talks to him about
religion, Ehrman says some of his best friends are Christian.

Ehrman, a best-selling author and a professor of religious studies at
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a biblical sleuth
whose investigations make some people very angry. Like the fictional
Robert Langdon character played by actor Tom Hanks in the movie
"Angels & Demons," he delves into the past to challenge some of
Christianity's central claims.

In Ehrman's latest book, "Jesus, Interrupted," he concludes:

Doctrines such as the divinity of Jesus and heaven and hell are not
based on anything Jesus or his earlier followers said.

At least 19 of the 27 books in the New Testament are forgeries.

Believing the Bible is infallible is not a condition for being a
Christian.

"Christianity has never been about the Bible being the inerrant word
of God," Ehrman says. "Christianity is about the belief in Christ."

Critic: 'There's a touch of arrogance' about him

Ehrman's claims have found an audience, and controversy. He's a
fixture on History Channel and Discovery Channel documentaries on
Christianity. He's appeared on National Public Radio, CNN and the BBC
and talked about scribes misquoting Jesus on "The Daily Show with Jon
Stewart."

Yet Ehrman's popularity also may be due to a larger trend. The books
of people like Elaine Pagels, author of "The Gnostic Gospels," and Dan
Brown, author of "The Da Vinci Code" and "Angels and Demons," resonate
with people who believe there are parts of the Bible that the church
left on history's editing floor.

Some scholarly critics say Ehrman is saying nothing new.

Bishop William H. Willimon, an author and United Methodist Church
bishop based in Alabama, says he doesn't like the "breathless tone" of
Ehrman's work.

"He keeps presenting this stuff as if this is wonderful new knowledge
that has been kept from you backward lay people and this is the stuff
your preachers don't have the guts to tell, and I have," Willimon
says. "There's a touch of arrogance in it."

Yet even many of Ehrman's critics say he has a knack for making arcane
New Testament scholarship accessible to the public.

"He has a gift for clear thinking and an ability to present some
complicated things in simple, direct ways," Willimon says.

Some pastors also say that Ehrman forces them to confront tough
questions about the Bible in front of their congregations.

"His take on the scriptures is a gift to the church because of his
ability to articulate questions and challenges," says Rev. Guy
Williams, a blogger who also happens to be a Methodist minister in
Houston, Texas. "It gives us an opportunity to wrestle with the
[Bible's] claims and questions."

Ehrman: There was no resurrection

Ehrman says that no one accepts everything in the Bible. Everyone
picks and chooses . Hecites some New Testament's references to the
role of women in church as an example.

In the first book of Corinthians, Ehrman says, the Apostle Paul
insists that women should remain silent in church (1 Corinthians
14:35-36).

In the 16th chapter of the book of Romans, Paul's attitude is that
women could and should be church leaders -- and he cites women who
were serving as deacons and apostles in the early church, Ehrman says.

Ehrman backs his arguments with a deep knowledge of the culture and
history of the New Testament world. He's written 20 books on early
Christianity and is an authority on ancient manuscripts used to
translate the Bible.

His claims, though, take on some of Christianity's most sacred tenets,
like the resurrection of Jesus. Ehrman says he doesn't think the
resurrection took place. There's no proof Jesus physically rose from
the dead, and the resurrection stories contradict one another, he
says.

He says he doesn't believe the followers of Jesus saw their master
bodily rise from the dead, but something else.

"My best guess is that what happened is what commonly happens today
when someone has a loved one die -- they sometimes think they see them
in a vision," Ehrman says. "I think some of the disciples had
visions."

Ehrman says he immerses himself in the Bible, though he doesn't
believe in its infallibility, because it's the most important book in
Western civilization.

"I have friends who teach medieval English," he says. "They don't
believe in Chaucer, but they think Chaucer is important," he writes in
the conclusion of "Jesus, Interrupted."

The fundamentalist turns agnostic

Ehrman once had a different attitude toward the Bible.

He was raised in the Episcopal Church in Lawrence, Kansas, and became
a fundamentalist Christian at age 15 when he met a charismatic
Christian youth group leader who reached out to him. Ehrman says he
later persuaded his parents to embrace a more conservative brand of
Christianity.

He says he became so devoted to the Bible that he memorized entire
sections. He was convinced the Bible was "God's words."

But Ehrman says he began to develop doubts about the infallibility of
the Bible after attending Princeton Theological Seminary to become a
college Bible professor.

He even began to change his opinion of the Christian youth group
leader who helped convert him. The youth leader visited Ehrman's
father when he was dying of cancer in a hospital.

The youth leader used a bottle of hotel shampoo to "anoint" his
father, and tried to persuade his father to confess specific sins,
Ehrman says. Ehrman says he was angry at the minister for acting "self-
righteous" and "hypocritical."

"For a vulnerable high-schooler who is trying to figure out the world,
a personality like that is very attractive," Ehrman says. "They're
like cult leaders. They have all the answers."

Ehrman says he later became an agnostic because he couldn't find the
answer to another question: How could there be a God when there is so
much suffering in the world? An agnostic is one who disclaims any
knowledge of God, but does not deny the possibility of God's
existence.

Today, Ehrman describes himself as a "happy agnostic."

But some people can't believe an agnostic can be happy, he says. They
tell him that they're praying for him. Others say worse. They say he's
being fooled by Satan and he's headed to hell. Some say he's the anti-
Christ.

"I'm not that powerful," he says, laughing.

His family, however, feels no obligation to talk to Ehrman about his
ideas on the Bible, Ehrman says. His mother, brother and sister remain
conservative Christians.

He once tried to talk to his mother about his new beliefs, but the
discussion proved fruitless.

"My mom is a strong evangelical," Ehrman says. "We talk basketball. We
don't talk religion."

Still, Ehrman says he still sends his mother and siblings copies of
his latest books. They've never responded, he says.

"I imagine they're hidden in a back room," he says.

Whether it's his family, critics or students, Ehrman says he has a
better handle on why he is so threatening to so many people -- some
Christians worry they will make the same decision he has.

"I changed my mind," he says. "My students find me more dangerous that
way. I really do know what they're talking about when they stake out
an evangelical position."
studio
2009-05-17 18:24:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Hmmm.... listening to my double disc Jimmy Buffet album, a live
recording named, appropriately, "You Had To Be There", roughly
1977.... lots of good time hedonistic rock and rolling southern
flavored music..... A Pirate Looks At Forty, Come Monday, He Went to
Paris, MIss You So Badly, The Captain And The Kid, Wonder Why We Ever
Go Home, Margaritaville...... still sounds good.   So does Neil
Diamond's 'Hot August Night'.   So does the Who's 'Who's Next' and
It's A Beautiful Day's 'Merrying Maiden', not to mention Waylon
Jenning's 'Love of the Common People'.   The Doors album play well
too... especially the first two, kind of dark but it's largely what
one brings to it.... it's okay to observe while totally listening.   I
think AC/DC's Highyway to Hell, totally experienced but no angry
embrace, is a good lesson in totally destructive turns one can make
with their life.
You make the burning of your records totally understood WM.  I get
what you are saying.  I've seen the affects of music and complimentary
lifestyle provide a future different than one available to some
otherwise gifted young people minus mentoring..... skate boarder
mentality and the thrasher music one example.... drugs and Quicksilver
Messenger Service another..... 'Imagine', one more.
WM- Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger service...you been there man.
Once I got better grounded I went back and hung out a bit with some of
my old buddies that had a good band by that time but they were
uncomfortable to say the least no matter what.
My son got some Led Zep- How the West was won the other day from the
library. He really likes their 3rd album and I never told him that it
was a favorite of mine as well back in the day. Anyway I didn't have a
blow out and in fact have let him indulge in my new collection. He
enjoys Tool as well.
In fact i have even written some "rock" music after all that blow out
period.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger Service... no, I wasn't there doing
that, just there.. the straight one hanging out, no one knew.
All things as building blocks, rock music as it evolved certainly is a
stepping stone available to the devil but it takes real refinement to
make good use of it for benefit of hell.  Here's an example of what I
consider to be the devils building with trades of higher skill,
building on 'Imagine'..........
----------------------------------------------------------------
Former fundamentalist 'debunks' Bible
Story Highlights
Meet a real-life "Angels & Demons" professor
Biblical scholar says most of New Testament is a forgery
Scholar's work gains audience skeptical of church
Scholar's mom no longer talks to him about his books
By John Blake
CNN
CNN -- Just so you know, Bart Ehrman says he's not the anti-Christ.
He says he's not trying to destroy your faith. He's not trying to bash
the Bible. And, though his mother no longer talks to him about
religion, Ehrman says some of his best friends are Christian.
Ehrman, a best-selling author and a professor of religious studies at
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a biblical sleuth
whose investigations make some people very angry. Like the fictional
Robert Langdon character played by actor Tom Hanks in the movie
"Angels & Demons," he delves into the past to challenge some of
Christianity's central claims.
Doctrines such as the divinity of Jesus and heaven and hell are not
based on anything Jesus or his earlier followers said.
At least 19 of the 27 books in the New Testament are forgeries.
Believing the Bible is infallible is not a condition for being a
Christian.
"Christianity has never been about the Bible being the inerrant word
of God," Ehrman says. "Christianity is about the belief in Christ."
Critic: 'There's a touch of arrogance' about him
Ehrman's claims have found an audience, and controversy. He's a
fixture on History Channel and Discovery Channel documentaries on
Christianity. He's appeared on National Public Radio, CNN and the BBC
and talked about scribes misquoting Jesus on "The Daily Show with Jon
Stewart."
Yet Ehrman's popularity also may be due to a larger trend. The books
of people like Elaine Pagels, author of "The Gnostic Gospels," and Dan
Brown, author of "The Da Vinci Code" and "Angels and Demons," resonate
with people who believe there are parts of the Bible that the church
left on history's editing floor.
Some scholarly critics say Ehrman is saying nothing new.
Bishop William H. Willimon, an author and United Methodist Church
bishop based in Alabama, says he doesn't like the "breathless tone" of
Ehrman's work.
"He keeps presenting this stuff as if this is wonderful new knowledge
that has been kept from you backward lay people and this is the stuff
your preachers don't have the guts to tell, and I have," Willimon
says. "There's a touch of arrogance in it."
Yet even many of Ehrman's critics say he has a knack for making arcane
New Testament scholarship accessible to the public.
"He has a gift for clear thinking and an ability to present some
complicated things in simple, direct ways," Willimon says.
Some pastors also say that Ehrman forces them to confront tough
questions about the Bible in front of their congregations.
"His take on the scriptures is a gift to the church because of his
ability to articulate questions and challenges," says Rev. Guy
Williams, a blogger who also happens to be a Methodist minister in
Houston, Texas. "It gives us an opportunity to wrestle with the
[Bible's] claims and questions."
Ehrman: There was no resurrection
Ehrman says that no one accepts everything in the Bible. Everyone
picks and chooses . Hecites some New Testament's references to the
role of women in church as an example.
In the first book of Corinthians, Ehrman says, the Apostle Paul
insists that women should remain silent in church (1 Corinthians
14:35-36).
In the 16th chapter of the book of Romans, Paul's attitude is that
women could and should be church leaders -- and he cites women who
were serving as deacons and apostles in the early church, Ehrman says.
Ehrman backs his arguments with a deep knowledge of the culture and
history of the New Testament world. He's written 20 books on early
Christianity and is an authority on ancient manuscripts used to
translate the Bible.
His claims, though, take on some of Christianity's most sacred tenets,
like the resurrection of Jesus. Ehrman says he doesn't think the
resurrection took place. There's no proof Jesus physically rose from
the dead, and the resurrection stories contradict one another, he
says.
He says he doesn't believe the followers of Jesus saw their master
bodily rise from the dead, but something else.
"My best guess is that what happened is what commonly happens today
when someone has a loved one die -- they sometimes think they see them
in a vision," Ehrman says. "I think some of the disciples had
visions."
Ehrman says he immerses himself in the Bible, though he doesn't
believe in its infallibility, because it's the most important book in
Western civilization.
"I have friends who teach medieval English," he says. "They don't
believe in Chaucer, but they think Chaucer is important," he writes in
the conclusion of "Jesus, Interrupted."
The fundamentalist turns agnostic
Ehrman once had a different attitude toward the Bible.
He was raised in the Episcopal Church in Lawrence, Kansas, and became
a fundamentalist Christian at age 15 when he met a charismatic
Christian youth group leader who reached out to him. Ehrman says he
later persuaded his parents to embrace a more conservative brand of
Christianity.
He says he became so devoted to the Bible that he memorized entire
sections. He was convinced the Bible was "God's words."
But Ehrman says he began to develop doubts about the infallibility of
the Bible after attending Princeton Theological Seminary to become a
college Bible professor.
He even began to change his opinion of the Christian youth group
leader who helped convert him. The youth leader visited Ehrman's
father when he was dying of cancer in a hospital.
The youth leader used a bottle of hotel shampoo to "anoint" his
father, and tried to persuade his father to confess specific sins,
Ehrman says. Ehrman says he was angry at the minister for acting "self-
righteous" and "hypocritical."
"For a vulnerable high-schooler who is trying to figure out the world,
a personality like that is very attractive," Ehrman says. "They're
like cult leaders. They have all the answers."
Ehrman says he later became an agnostic because he couldn't find the
answer to another question: How could there be a God when there is so
much suffering in the world? An agnostic is one who disclaims any
knowledge of God, but does not deny the possibility of God's
existence.
Today, Ehrman describes himself as a "happy agnostic."
But some people can't believe an agnostic can be happy, he says. They
tell him that they're praying for him. Others say worse. They say he's
being fooled by Satan and he's headed to hell. Some say he's the anti-
Christ.
"I'm not that powerful," he says, laughing.
His family, however, feels no obligation to talk to Ehrman about his
ideas on the Bible, Ehrman says. His mother, brother and sister remain
conservative Christians.
He once tried to talk to his mother about his new beliefs, but the
discussion proved fruitless.
"My mom is a strong evangelical," Ehrman says. "We talk basketball. We
don't talk religion."
Still, Ehrman says he still sends his mother and siblings copies of
his latest books. They've never responded, he says.
"I imagine they're hidden in a back room," he says.
Whether it's his family, critics or students, Ehrman says he has a
better handle on why he is so threatening to so many people -- some
Christians ...
read more »- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
.
.
.
..
studio wrote:

This wouldn't be much of a threat to anyone
who has a few books on Bible difficulties
at their disposal.

To say the Apostles saw visions and not
the actual risen Christ would go over pretty good
after a few too many brews, but what a joke if
he actually has swayed people with that line!

Most of the agnostics that I've encountered have
had a stringent religious lifestyle as they were
growing up. I guess it's par for the course.

He actually memorized entire Bible passages?
Is he crazy or something? Reminds me of
that Samuel L. Jackson character in the
Pulp Fiction movie.





Watching the Wheels by John Lennon


People say Im crazy doing what Im doing
Well they give me all kinds of warnings to save me from ruin
When I say that Im o.k. well they look at me
kind of strange
Surely youre not happy now you no longer play the game

People say Im lazy dreaming my life away
Well they give me all kinds of advice designed to enlighten me
When I tell them that Im doing fine watching shadows on the wall
Dont you miss the big time boy youre no longer on the ball?

Im just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round
I really love to watch them roll
No longer riding on the merry-go-round
I just had to let it go

Ah, people asking questions lost in confusion
Well I tell them theres no problem, only solutions
Well they shake their heads and they look at me as if Ive lost my mind
I tell them theres no hurry
Im just sitting here doing time

Im just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round
I really love to watch them roll
No longer riding on the merry-go-round
I just had to let it go
I just had to let it go
I just had to let it go
b***@hotmail.com
2009-05-17 18:43:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by studio
This wouldn't be much of a threat to anyone
who has a few books on Bible difficulties
at their disposal.
To say the Apostles saw visions and not
the actual risen Christ would go over pretty good
after a few too many brews, but what a joke if
he actually has swayed people with that line!
Most of the agnostics that I've encountered have
had a stringent religious lifestyle as they were
growing up. I guess it's par for the course.
He actually memorized entire Bible passages?
Is he crazy or something? Reminds me of
that Samuel L. Jackson character in the
Pulp Fiction movie.
rpbc:
That's who he's writing to... those who don't have a few books on
Bible difficulties at their disposal, or don't use them. Instead of
looking it up, what he says paradies itself as knowledge filled with
wisdom, with Imagine running through their heads. Forgetting the
context, I remember a comedy line from a Martin Mull album where he
said concerning something that was relevant to his skit..... instead
of thinking about it I decided to look it up (for an answer). One has
to be still and watch, as in wheels go round, for sure, but one also
has to have good information.

Personally, I've always found Imagine and Wheels seductive but dark
and unsettling with a big touch of self satisfaction woven into them.
Weatherman
2009-05-19 12:45:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Post by studio
This wouldn't be much of a threat to anyone
who has a few books on Bible difficulties
at their disposal.
To say the Apostles saw visions and not
the actual risen Christ would go over pretty good
after a few too many brews, but what a joke if
he actually has swayed people with that line!
Most of the agnostics that I've encountered have
had a stringent religious lifestyle as they were
growing up. I guess it's par for the course.
He actually memorized entire Bible passages?
Is he crazy or something? Reminds me of
that Samuel L. Jackson character in the
Pulp Fiction movie.
That's who he's writing to... those who don't have a few books on
Bible difficulties at their disposal, or don't use them.   Instead of
looking it up, what he says paradies itself as knowledge filled with
wisdom, with Imagine running through their heads.   Forgetting the
context, I remember a comedy line from a Martin Mull album where he
said concerning something that was relevant to his skit..... instead
of thinking about it I decided to look it up (for an answer).  One has
to be still and watch, as in wheels go round, for sure, but one also
has to have good information.
Personally, I've always found Imagine and Wheels seductive but dark
and unsettling with a big touch of self satisfaction woven into them.
WM-Yep.
Weatherman
2009-05-17 19:11:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger Service... no, I wasn't there doing
that, just there.. the straight one hanging out, no one knew.
All things as building blocks, rock music as it evolved certainly is a
stepping stone available to the devil but it takes real refinement to
make good use of it for benefit of hell.  Here's an example of what I
consider to be the devils building with trades of higher skill,
building on 'Imagine'..........
----------------------------------------------------------------
Former fundamentalist 'debunks' Bible
Story Highlights
Meet a real-life "Angels & Demons" professor
WM-You lurker you. "no, I wasn't there doing
Post by b***@hotmail.com
that, just there.. the straight one hanging out, no one knew".
I read this article on another discussion board. The discussion was
very lame and bating so I just didn't join in. A person really has to
be stupid to use this sort of thing to write off God. This has to be a
classic case of ever learning yet never coming to the knowledge of
truth.
b***@hotmail.com
2009-05-17 19:29:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger Service... no, I wasn't there doing
that, just there.. the straight one hanging out, no one knew.
All things as building blocks, rock music as it evolved certainly is a
stepping stone available to the devil but it takes real refinement to
make good use of it for benefit of hell.  Here's an example of what I
consider to be the devils building with trades of higher skill,
building on 'Imagine'..........
----------------------------------------------------------------
Former fundamentalist 'debunks' Bible
Story Highlights
Meet a real-life "Angels & Demons" professor
WM-You lurker you. "no, I wasn't there doing
Post by b***@hotmail.com
that, just there.. the straight one hanging out, no one knew".
I read this article on another discussion board. The discussion was
very lame and bating so I just didn't join in. A person really has to
be stupid to use this sort of thing to write off God. This has to be a
classic case of ever learning yet never coming to the knowledge of
truth.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
rpbc:
Stupid. Certainly some of that, also very ignorant. Nothing to
join in.

Lurker.... yes. Later, after having read Huxley's Doors of Perception
I did experience but no return visits.
Weatherman
2009-05-17 19:44:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Drugs and Quicksilver Messenger Service... no, I wasn't there doing
that, just there.. the straight one hanging out, no one knew.
All things as building blocks, rock music as it evolved certainly is a
stepping stone available to the devil but it takes real refinement to
make good use of it for benefit of hell.  Here's an example of what I
consider to be the devils building with trades of higher skill,
building on 'Imagine'..........
----------------------------------------------------------------
Former fundamentalist 'debunks' Bible
Story Highlights
Meet a real-life "Angels & Demons" professor
WM-You lurker you. "no, I wasn't there doing
Post by b***@hotmail.com
that, just there.. the straight one hanging out, no one knew".
I read this article on another discussion board. The discussion was
very lame and bating so I just didn't join in. A person really has to
be stupid to use this sort of thing to write off God. This has to be a
classic case of ever learning yet never coming to the knowledge of
truth.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Stupid.   Certainly some of that, also very ignorant.   Nothing to
join in.
Lurker.... yes.  Later, after having read Huxley's Doors of Perception
I did experience but no return visits.
WM-No return visits. Good for you, you missed nothing and could
probably tell that early on.
Weatherman
2009-05-19 12:50:21 UTC
Permalink
WM-Someone in here posted something about the satanic overtones that
were clear latter in RR. Just wanted to remind that negro blues men
have always been considered as playing the devils music by their own.
Many of those heavies that white rockers worked off of.
b***@hotmail.com
2009-05-19 15:57:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
WM-Someone in here posted something about the satanic overtones that
were clear latter in RR. Just wanted to remind that negro blues men
have always been considered as playing the devils music by their own.
Many of those heavies that white rockers worked off of.
rpbc:
I like Bobby Blue Bland type stuff. 'There Ain't Nothing You Can
Do'..... When you've got a headache a little headache powder see you
thru, but when you got a hearrrrrtache..... there ain't nothen' you
can do....

Papillon
2009-05-17 01:08:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by matt2442
Post by Papillon
Hmmm... I am kind of, well not proud. but happy for not destroying my
albums. It is one area in which I didn't turn in to a total dick in
my youthful days as a member of the Church.
Well it's one thing if you burn your records, it's another thing
entirely if you demand it of others to prove to you that they love
Jesus. I remember my friend Claude in High School who got saved one
summer. Not only did he destroy his own records, but he burned his
brother's records as well, and became the kind of obnoxious new
convert that really irritates even other christians.
WM-Yea that was me. Burn them or hit the road. I was all of 18 and
coming down off a major stone man. Looking back so much to do
shouldn't have been made over nothing. Maybe.
I was burning my AC/DC albums about the same time Bond Scott was
dieing. True story. What are the odds? Have always felt guilty about
it for some reason to tell you the truth.
Saw a black mass in my brothers room, Black Sabbath guy, one of the
albums was out at the time. Saw Butler on tv talking about the band
seeing a black figure in the studio from time to time and how it
scared the crap out of him. That was years after but once hearing that
I though could it have been the same spirit? Anyway I burnt that
album. My brother didn't seem to mind much becouse he had seen things
and so had my mom. And I knew nothing really about what was being said
in christian circles about rock music.
So you see there was more to it than just being a legalistic ass hole
on a kick.
I knew some guys down the road that were heavy BS guys and drug users.
One ODed, another killed himself becouse he got high and caused a fire
in the house that killed another brother. Always the god dammed Black
Sabbath in the background. Them and some others, Step'in Wolf, BS,
cult following. Almost all of them ended up in life's shit can.
Anyway to escape, who cares what it looks like just get the blank OUT
friend.
Reminds me of Gideon tearing down the stupid foreign stone god and
grove his dumbass father had. "Whats wrong with your son man? Dickhead
should chill out. We're gong to kill that stupid religious bastard. He
better get over himself self righteous prick."
Ego and excess are far more responsible for one ending up in life's
shit can than Satan. Sure he's a handy scapegoat to blame, the way
the Scotts do, but fallen man is generally the true culprit in one's
own destruction.
Papillon
2009-05-17 01:16:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by matt2442
Post by Papillon
Hmmm... I am kind of, well not proud. but happy for not destroying my
albums. It is one area in which I didn't turn in to a total dick in
my youthful days as a member of the Church.
Well it's one thing if you burn your records, it's another thing
entirely if you demand it of others to prove to you that they love
Jesus. I remember my friend Claude in High School who got saved one
summer. Not only did he destroy his own records, but he burned his
brother's records as well, and became the kind of obnoxious new
convert that really irritates even other christians.
I never cared what other people did. Never preached at others to
change. My total-dickness was more internalized. Hell, I was a
member of Scott's church and that made me better than anyone and if
you' weren't a member of Scott's church then you were fucked anyway so
why even bother trying to enlighten you! <snort> Fortunately I
eventually woke up to the fact that I was a douchebag following an
even bigger douchebag and my only hope at salvation lay in Christ and
Christ alone.
Weatherman
2009-05-16 21:50:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Papillon
Post by matt2442
Post by Weatherman
WM-Yea maybe. It had to do with hard rock and the pointlessness of the
drug/rock culture immersion. The life style and all that hard music
not only started to drive me crazy but the entire emptiness and
cheapness it all turned out to be left me felling rather disgusted. So
I tossed the vast majority of the lifestyle and the associated things
in an effort to find some grounding in sanity and Christ. Cold
turkey.
I was a baptist and got on the anti rock kick, was a young christian.
Cant say that I was involved with an anti rock pastor or anything just
did it myself. In fact my pastor thought I was going overboard.
Now I know some of you strong and well adjusted young Christians that
never had a traumatic break form anything being so well rounded and
level headed are so proud of yourselves but you may never have had to
take on a sort of wrestling for your soul. That condition alone for a
young inexperienced warrior can result in a slash and burn approach to
things in your life. Now I could use other language to describe all of
this but we are in mixed company here and it never pays to be totally
open outside of others that have shared some of the same experiences.
I don't feel proud that I didn't burn my music. I can recall some
struggle with the same music you are talking about shortly after high
school. I had not gone so far as to completely give my life to Christ
yet, but I remember passing on free tickets to an AC/DC concert in
1982, and it was mainly over some of their lyrics (highway to hell,
hell ain't a bad place to be, etc.) that was disturbing to me for some
reason at the time. Just a couple of years earlier I'd have been all
over free AC/DC tickets. I can also recall a Black Sabbath concert
with Ronnie James Dio at the same period of time, where he said
something to the audience about "I'm going to burn in Hell, with ALL
OF YOU!!!" The response was loud cheering as if this were a good
thing. I was high as a kite, but pretty sure I did not want to go to
hell.
If I had any pride about not burning my music at the time, I remeber
that Gene Scott's church was full of such people, and look where we
were...with GENE SCOTT. I've often wondered if it would have been
beneficial for a time to go through a sort of legalistic bootcamp for
a period of time, ultimately to experience God's Grace, and learn of
the liberty we have in Christ as the Holy Spirit revealed it to me,
rather that jumping head first into Gene Scott's version of liberty in
Christ.
Hmmm... I am kind of, well not proud. but happy for not destroying my
albums.  It is one area in which I didn't turn in to a total dick in
my youthful days as a member of the Church.
WM-Whatever. But you were a dick. lol
Papillon
2009-05-16 21:54:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by Papillon
Post by matt2442
Post by Weatherman
WM-Yea maybe. It had to do with hard rock and the pointlessness of the
drug/rock culture immersion. The life style and all that hard music
not only started to drive me crazy but the entire emptiness and
cheapness it all turned out to be left me felling rather disgusted. So
I tossed the vast majority of the lifestyle and the associated things
in an effort to find some grounding in sanity and Christ. Cold
turkey.
I was a baptist and got on the anti rock kick, was a young christian.
Cant say that I was involved with an anti rock pastor or anything just
did it myself. In fact my pastor thought I was going overboard.
Now I know some of you strong and well adjusted young Christians that
never had a traumatic break form anything being so well rounded and
level headed are so proud of yourselves but you may never have had to
take on a sort of wrestling for your soul. That condition alone for a
young inexperienced warrior can result in a slash and burn approach to
things in your life. Now I could use other language to describe all of
this but we are in mixed company here and it never pays to be totally
open outside of others that have shared some of the same experiences.
I don't feel proud that I didn't burn my music. I can recall some
struggle with the same music you are talking about shortly after high
school. I had not gone so far as to completely give my life to Christ
yet, but I remember passing on free tickets to an AC/DC concert in
1982, and it was mainly over some of their lyrics (highway to hell,
hell ain't a bad place to be, etc.) that was disturbing to me for some
reason at the time. Just a couple of years earlier I'd have been all
over free AC/DC tickets. I can also recall a Black Sabbath concert
with Ronnie James Dio at the same period of time, where he said
something to the audience about "I'm going to burn in Hell, with ALL
OF YOU!!!" The response was loud cheering as if this were a good
thing. I was high as a kite, but pretty sure I did not want to go to
hell.
If I had any pride about not burning my music at the time, I remeber
that Gene Scott's church was full of such people, and look where we
were...with GENE SCOTT. I've often wondered if it would have been
beneficial for a time to go through a sort of legalistic bootcamp for
a period of time, ultimately to experience God's Grace, and learn of
the liberty we have in Christ as the Holy Spirit revealed it to me,
rather that jumping head first into Gene Scott's version of liberty in
Christ.
Hmmm... I am kind of, well not proud. but happy for not destroying my
albums. It is one area in which I didn't turn in to a total dick in
my youthful days as a member of the Church.
WM-Whatever. But you were a dick. lol
Still am. But back then I was a total dick.
Papillon
2009-05-16 18:53:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by Papillon
Post by Weatherman
Post by Papillon
I know a lot of people who threw away their albums when they became
Christians. Of course as they matured in the faith they wished they'd
not acted so rashly.
WM-I did that and it was probably what needed to be done at the time.
Looking back at most of what I got rid of, even today, it belonged in
the trash can.
So you're telling us you have really bad taste in music? Hehe.
WM-Yea maybe. It had to do with hard rock and the pointlessness of the
drug/rock culture immersion. The life style and all that hard music
not only started to drive me crazy but the entire emptiness and
cheapness it all turned out to be left me felling rather disgusted. So
I tossed the vast majority of the lifestyle and the associated things
in an effort to find some grounding in sanity and Christ. Cold
turkey.
I was a baptist and got on the anti rock kick, was a young christian.
Cant say that I was involved with an anti rock pastor or anything just
did it myself. In fact my pastor thought I was going overboard.
Now I know some of you strong and well adjusted young Christians that
never had a traumatic break form anything being so well rounded and
level headed are so proud of yourselves but you may never have had to
take on a sort of wrestling for your soul. That condition alone for a
young inexperienced warrior can result in a slash and burn approach to
things in your life. Now I could use other language to describe all of
this but we are in mixed company here and it never pays to be totally
open outside of others that have shared some of the same experiences.
Oh get over yourself, WM.
matt2442
2009-05-16 03:56:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Papillon
Post by matt2442
Nothing entirely new either. I've seen "Rock and Roll Sorcerers of the
New Age" and I think there's another onre called "Hell's Bells" or
"They Sold Their Souls for Rock and Roll" or something like that which
supposedly document that just about everyone you can think of from
Elvis to more recent artists have all been heavily into the teachings
of Aleister Crowley and have sold their souls to the devil to make it
big in music. The bottom line in all of these is to tell us that we
should not listen to this "evil rock and roll music."
I know a lot of people who threw away their albums when they became
Christians. Of course as they matured in the faith they wished they'd
not acted so rashly.
Matt2442:
I know several too. At least one of them, though, would agree with WM
that it was needed, at least for him, at that time in his life and
walk with the Lord. Even today he'd say it was the Lord who led him to
do it, not a bunch of legalistic Christians, because they were
something that he put in front of God, idols if you will. As time went
on, he felt that he had the liberty once again to listen to a lot of
his old favorites, because he had his priorities in order. I've never
burned any records, or felt it was necessary, but I can respect anyone
who has felt that way at some time. What I can't stand are those weak
Christians who think they are mature because they don't listen to any
"secular music," and think that it is a law that all Christians must
obey.
Papillon
2009-05-16 06:39:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by matt2442
Post by Papillon
Post by matt2442
Nothing entirely new either. I've seen "Rock and Roll Sorcerers of the
New Age" and I think there's another onre called "Hell's Bells" or
"They Sold Their Souls for Rock and Roll" or something like that which
supposedly document that just about everyone you can think of from
Elvis to more recent artists have all been heavily into the teachings
of Aleister Crowley and have sold their souls to the devil to make it
big in music. The bottom line in all of these is to tell us that we
should not listen to this "evil rock and roll music."
I know a lot of people who threw away their albums when they became
Christians. Of course as they matured in the faith they wished they'd
not acted so rashly.
I know several too. At least one of them, though, would agree with WM
that it was needed, at least for him, at that time in his life and
walk with the Lord. Even today he'd say it was the Lord who led him to
do it, not a bunch of legalistic Christians, because they were
something that he put in front of God, idols if you will. As time went
on, he felt that he had the liberty once again to listen to a lot of
his old favorites, because he had his priorities in order. I've never
burned any records, or felt it was necessary, but I can respect anyone
who has felt that way at some time. What I can't stand are those weak
Christians who think they are mature because they don't listen to any
"secular music," and think that it is a law that all Christians must
obey.
I have no problem with people following their conscience - though the
conscience of new believers has never struck me as being particularly
spirit-led. The people I know would have tossed Carpenter albums just
because someone would possibly call it "Rock n Roll". As a new
believer I tossed a Buddha incense burner because I though it
represented an idol. Fortunately my albums survived those early
days. Later they all got burned up in the panorama fire but that's
not really relevant to the subject.
b***@hotmail.com
2009-05-16 03:32:48 UTC
Permalink
On May 15, 9:41 am,
Post by H8N S8N
"The suspicion, however, was not without merit," explains Niezgoda.
"The clues were there, and too numerous to be ignored. They just
needed to be viewed through a different lens to create not a picture
of a past conspiracy, but a future tragedy. When examined as a
possible prophecy, the clues appear to be quite clearly not about
Paul, but about John Lennon."
Niezgoda is convinced the Beatles had supernatural help – not only
with their rise to the top, but with these "clues" that seemed so
persuasive that something was not right within the Beatles. He's not
happy about his conclusion. In fact, as a lifelong Beatles fan, he
seems deeply conflicted.
"I have always had to deal with the constant conflict of my love for
their music and the evil that I perceive surrounds it," he told WND.
"The only difference is that I have tried to define or make sense of
it with the help of this book."
I am not saying I agree or disagree here.
Just posting the story
If nothing else it is certainly an interesting story.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
rpbc:
Paul married Linda and had a love of his life, and wrote 'Let It Be'.
John married Yoko, the missy of his life, and wrote 'Imagine'. There
was/is a fundamental difference, whatever the ground.
matt2442
2009-05-16 03:44:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Paul married Linda and had a love of his life, and wrote 'Let It Be'.
John married Yoko, the missy of his life, and wrote 'Imagine'. There
was/is a fundamental difference, whatever the ground.
Matt2442:
"Imagine" actually could be the antichrist's global anthem. Not taking
away from John's talent, but that's really the nature of that song.
Yoko's latest release is called "Yes, I'm a Witch."

http://www.amazon.com/Yes-Im-Witch-Yoko-Ono/dp/B000LC520K
Papillon
2009-05-16 06:43:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by matt2442
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Paul married Linda and had a love of his life, and wrote 'Let It Be'.
John married Yoko, the missy of his life, and wrote 'Imagine'. There
was/is a fundamental difference, whatever the ground.
"Imagine" actually could be the antichrist's global anthem. Not taking
away from John's talent, but that's really the nature of that song.
Yoko's latest release is called "Yes, I'm a Witch."
http://www.amazon.com/Yes-Im-Witch-Yoko-Ono/dp/B000LC520K
It's no reflection on his talent. It's a beautiful song - until you
stop and really listen to the lyrics. A definite anthem for the anti-
Christ.
matt2442
2009-05-16 05:28:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Papillon
If nothing else it is certainly an interesting story.
Matt2442:
I just read the entire article. I didn't have time earlier. It
certainly is interesting. I'll probably read the guys book, since he
says that he is a fan of their music and not some Baptist preacher
demonizing everything Rock and Roll. The same legend surrounds Led
Zeppelin and their rise to fame. I love their music too.
I have no doubt that many people back in the 60's and 70's probably
did dabble, if not immerse themselves entirely, into the occult. The
story of Jimmy Page's involvement is notorious. The possibility of a
sort of demonic anointing is an interesting thing to consider. I was
into the Grateful Dead scene for awhile until Jerry Garcia passed
away. If anything might seem like a sort of pied piper trip, it would
be the Grateful Dead. I love those guys. I even downloaded a couple of
recent shows from their current tour. But even so, I always wondered
why people would throw years of their lives into following this band
around the country. Satan offered the the kingdoms of this world to
Jesus. They were his to offer. Talent is God given, but money power,
and fame are the devil's to give.
studio
2009-05-15 19:28:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by H8N S8N
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=97837
Posted: May 14, 2009
8:20 pm Eastern
© 2009 WorldNetDaily
WASHINGTON – The Beatles meteoric rise, unprecedented in popular
culture and unrivaled nearly four decades after the band broke up, is
at least partly explained, says a new book, by a pact John Lennon made
with the Devil.
In "The Lennon Prophecy," author Joseph Niezgoda reveals that Lennon
himself, obsessed with the occult, magic, numerology and being bigger
than Elvis Presley, confided in his friend Tony Sheridan that he made
such a deal. The book also makes the case that the "death clues" long
associated with Paul McCartney were actually subliminal messages
hinting at Lennon's fate.
Written by a lifelong Beatles fan and musician, the book hypothesizes
the pact was made just before the band experienced its first major
successes and ended 20 years later with Lennon's assassination in New
York by Mark David Chapman, who later claimed to have demons exorcized
from him while serving his sentence for murder in Attica State Prison.
"Chapman said that as the last demon left his body he was given the
reason for his possession," Niezgoda told WND. "It was to make a show
of Satan's great power in the world using John Lennon's murder as the
vehicle. I've always held an intuitive belief … that the true author
of this story is Satan and that I am only the messenger."
Get the book that lays out the case for John Lennon's pact with Satan
– "The Lennon Prophecy" by Joseph Niezgoda.
Of course, many will reject the notion that there is a real spirit
called Satan. Others will scoff at the notion that people can make
pacts with him that can result in real-world results.
So Niezgoda devotes a chapter to what may surprise many readers as
fairly well-documented historical Satanic pacts – including the case
of Johann Faust, who, in his Renaissance Age period, achieved fame and
fortune perhaps equal to Lennon and the Beatles four centuries later.
He, too, met an untimely, mysterious and grotesquely inexplicable
death 20 years later.
While Faust boasted of performing more miracles than Jesus Christ,
Lennon created controversy by boasting that his band was more famous
than Jesus Christ.
"If John had entered into a 20-year pact with the Devil for wealth and
world fame, that contract ended on December 8, 1980, with his violent
death," said Niezgoda. "Counting back 20 years, did anything unusual
in Beatles history occur in December 1960?"
In fact, it did, Niezgoda recalls. On Dec. 27, 1960, the Beatles
played the Town Hall Ball Room in Litherland, England.
"It was said that following this single night's performance, the
Beatles never looked back," recalls Niezgoda. "Each of the Beatles
remembers this night as the turning point in their careers."
Immediately following this memorable performance, the Beatles began
playing in Liverpool's Cavern Club, where they became a local
phenomenon. Then they moved on to Hamburg, where German audiences went
wild.
That gig also marked the beginning of Lennon's avowedly anti-Christian
behavior. In the book "The Love You Make" by Peter Brown, he recounts
how Lennon donned a dog collar made of paper, cut out a paper cross
and began preaching to the Hamburg audience – drawing a mocking
picture of Jesus hanging on the cross wearing a pair of bedroom
slippers.
Later, also in Germany, on Good Friday, Lennon targeted a group of
nuns with a life-size effigy of Jesus on the cross hanging from his
balcony.
"As the sisters gazed in astonishment at this sacrilegious display,
biographer Albert Goldman.
Pete Best, the original drummer with the group, also witnessed such
behavior and wrote about it in his own book describing how Lennon
urinated on another group of nuns from his balcony while proclaiming,
"Raindrops from heaven!"
These were just some of the ways Lennon confronted and antagonized
Christian worshippers – for seemingly no reason other than his own
amusement.
The book devotes a full chapter to Lennon's childhood of tragedy,
disappointment and sadness. His mother, Julia, and his father,
Freddie, fought over custody of young John. At 5 years old, he was
forced to decide which parent he would choose. He first chose his
father. But when his mother asked him if he was sure, he ran to her.
"John never forgot the horror of that incident," writes Niezgoda. "It
left a permanent scar and great feelings of insecurity, and nearly 20
years would pass before he would see his father again."
Life with Julia Lennon was no bargain. He was often left home alone
and found it difficult to sleep. Lennon later recalled that she was
"not prostituting for money but rather for silk stockings."
At age 6, Lennon began running away from home to stay with his Aunt
Mimi. He learned which trolleys to take by the quality of the black
leather seats, he explained.
"To this day, I'm fond of black leather," he would say later. "I find
it comforting."
Sometimes he would be picked up by adults concerned for his welfare
and taken to a local police station.
"I could never find the right words to explain my situation," he would
say.
Lennon's troubles continued through schooling – taking little interest
in classroom learning, showing contempt for teachers, skipping class,
smoking and swearing, cheating on exams, stealing candy from other
children and pilfering cigarettes to make money.
He was thrown out of religious chorus for substituting obscene words
in hymns.
Another biographer wrote: "John regularly poked fun at church
dignitaries, parodied hymns and drew blasphemous cartoons of Christ on
the cross in a way that only the once-faithful can."
Perhaps to compensate for his tough childhood, Lennon became consumed
with becoming both rich and famous.
Pete Best recalled how Lennon would say he was going to get to the top
– one way or another.
"If we have to be bent or con people, then that's what we'll have to
do to get there," Best quoted Lennon as saying. "It doesn't matter
what it takes to get to the top. It might cause some heartache, but
once I'm up there, it'll be a different kettle of fish. Yes, he did
say, 'I' and not 'we.' That was the real John Lennon, brilliant,
amusing but ruthless."
Niezgoda cites the unprecedented and unsurpassed "mania" that
surrounded the Beatles as one of the most intriguing clues suggesting
something supernatural about their career.
"John, Paul, George and Ringo were highly talented writers and
musicians – as all too well evidenced by their solo careers," Niezgoda
told WND. "But what was it at the beginning that set them apart from
their contemporaries? What was it that lifted them in a few short
years from utter obscurity to become the greatest show on Earth. When
they traveled to Australia in 1964, what earthly power caused 400,000
fans to gather outside their hotel to merely catch a glimpse of the
four young boys from Liverpool? How does one logically account for 20
number one hit records in a brief period of six years?
"Nothing before or since has come close to equaling the rapid and
widespread emotional pandemic frenzy surrounding the Beatles. I can go
on indefinitely listing their unearthly accomplishments but that is
not providing an explanation for it. Trying to explain the source of
the Beatles fame and fortune is like trying to define magic."
At the peak of their popularity, Beatles fans became obsessed with
what appeared to be clues in their music about a death within the
band. At the time, the focus was on speculation that McCartney had
been killed in a car crash and replaced with a lookalike.
Not even a press conference by Paul could persuade devotees of the
clues that he was, in fact, the real deal. It all seemed silly after
McCartney's long and illustrious solo career took off.
"The suspicion, however, was not without merit," explains Niezgoda.
"The clues were there, and too numerous to be ignored. They just
needed to be viewed through a different lens to create not a picture
of a past conspiracy, but a future tragedy. When examined as a
possible prophecy, the clues appear to be quite clearly not about
Paul, but about John Lennon."
Niezgoda is convinced the Beatles had supernatural help – not only
with their rise to the top, but with these "clues" that seemed so
persuasive that something was not right within the Beatles. He's not
happy about his conclusion. In fact, as a lifelong Beatles fan, he
seems deeply conflicted.
"I have always had to deal with the constant conflict of my love for
their music and the evil that I perceive surrounds it," he told WND.
"The only difference is that I have tried to define or make sense of
it with the help of this book."
I am not saying I agree or disagree here.
Just posting the story
.
.
.
.
.
.
studio wrote:


So Paul's talent was just crap then right?

That's hogwash just like the rest of the book.
The sad part is that there are going to be some
runny nosed conspiracy propellorhead religionists
that are going to take this book as Bible and
come to some weird conclusion that Ringo
is the anitxhrist! Get real.

The life that John and Paul lead was pretty rough
and tumble despite their fame and fortune.
These guys, these young guys had talent oozing
out of their pores.
If anything, John Lennon was a bit of a depressed
loner type young man. He eventually broke out of that
because his wife broke him and molded him to become
a man in his own head.

The last album John wrote was nothing but maturity
at it's artistic finest.

As far as the Cavern Club being a step up from where
they played before? Have you ever seen that dump?
When you're at the bottom there's only up!

The only ones possessed in this story are

1. Mark David Chapman (the killer) The Catcher in the Rye

2. The writer of this book (Paperback Writer)

3. The readers (All you need is Love)

4. J. D. Salinger (I am the Walrus)

5. Phil Spector ( Help)


HELP by John Lennon

Help, I need somebody,
Help, not just anybody,
Help, you know I need someone, help.

When I was younger, so much younger than today,
I never needed anybody's help in any way.
But now these days are gone, I'm not so self assured,
Now I find I've changed my mind and opened up the doors.

Help me if you can, I'm feeling down
And I do appreciate you being round.
Help me, get my feet back on the ground,
Won't you please, please help me?

And now my life has changed in oh so many ways,
My independence seems to vanish in the haze.
But every now and then I feel so insecure,
I know that I just need you like I've never done before.

Help me if you can, I'm feeling down
And I do appreciate you being round.
Help me, get my feet back on the ground,
Won't you please, please help me.

When I was younger, so much younger than today,
I never needed anybody's help in any way.
But now these days are gone, I'm not so self assured,
Now I find I've changed my mind and opened up the doors.

Help me if you can, I'm feeling down
And I do appreciate you being round.
Help me, get my feet back on the ground,
Won't you please, please help me, help me, help me, oh.
Papillon
2009-05-15 20:27:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by studio
Post by H8N S8N
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=97837
Posted: May 14, 2009
8:20 pm Eastern
© 2009 WorldNetDaily
WASHINGTON – The Beatles meteoric rise, unprecedented in popular
culture and unrivaled nearly four decades after the band broke up, is
at least partly explained, says a new book, by a pact John Lennon made
with the Devil.
In "The Lennon Prophecy," author Joseph Niezgoda reveals that Lennon
himself, obsessed with the occult, magic, numerology and being bigger
than Elvis Presley, confided in his friend Tony Sheridan that he made
such a deal. The book also makes the case that the "death clues" long
associated with Paul McCartney were actually subliminal messages
hinting at Lennon's fate.
Written by a lifelong Beatles fan and musician, the book hypothesizes
the pact was made just before the band experienced its first major
successes and ended 20 years later with Lennon's assassination in New
York by Mark David Chapman, who later claimed to have demons exorcized
from him while serving his sentence for murder in Attica State Prison.
"Chapman said that as the last demon left his body he was given the
reason for his possession," Niezgoda told WND. "It was to make a show
of Satan's great power in the world using John Lennon's murder as the
vehicle. I've always held an intuitive belief … that the true author
of this story is Satan and that I am only the messenger."
Get the book that lays out the case for John Lennon's pact with Satan
– "The Lennon Prophecy" by Joseph Niezgoda.
Of course, many will reject the notion that there is a real spirit
called Satan. Others will scoff at the notion that people can make
pacts with him that can result in real-world results.
So Niezgoda devotes a chapter to what may surprise many readers as
fairly well-documented historical Satanic pacts – including the case
of Johann Faust, who, in his Renaissance Age period, achieved fame and
fortune perhaps equal to Lennon and the Beatles four centuries later.
He, too, met an untimely, mysterious and grotesquely inexplicable
death 20 years later.
While Faust boasted of performing more miracles than Jesus Christ,
Lennon created controversy by boasting that his band was more famous
than Jesus Christ.
"If John had entered into a 20-year pact with the Devil for wealth and
world fame, that contract ended on December 8, 1980, with his violent
death," said Niezgoda. "Counting back 20 years, did anything unusual
in Beatles history occur in December 1960?"
In fact, it did, Niezgoda recalls. On Dec. 27, 1960, the Beatles
played the Town Hall Ball Room in Litherland, England.
"It was said that following this single night's performance, the
Beatles never looked back," recalls Niezgoda. "Each of the Beatles
remembers this night as the turning point in their careers."
Immediately following this memorable performance, the Beatles began
playing in Liverpool's Cavern Club, where they became a local
phenomenon. Then they moved on to Hamburg, where German audiences went
wild.
That gig also marked the beginning of Lennon's avowedly anti-Christian
behavior. In the book "The Love You Make" by Peter Brown, he recounts
how Lennon donned a dog collar made of paper, cut out a paper cross
and began preaching to the Hamburg audience – drawing a mocking
picture of Jesus hanging on the cross wearing a pair of bedroom
slippers.
Later, also in Germany, on Good Friday, Lennon targeted a group of
nuns with a life-size effigy of Jesus on the cross hanging from his
balcony.
"As the sisters gazed in astonishment at this sacrilegious display,
biographer Albert Goldman.
Pete Best, the original drummer with the group, also witnessed such
behavior and wrote about it in his own book describing how Lennon
urinated on another group of nuns from his balcony while proclaiming,
"Raindrops from heaven!"
These were just some of the ways Lennon confronted and antagonized
Christian worshippers – for seemingly no reason other than his own
amusement.
The book devotes a full chapter to Lennon's childhood of tragedy,
disappointment and sadness. His mother, Julia, and his father,
Freddie, fought over custody of young John. At 5 years old, he was
forced to decide which parent he would choose. He first chose his
father. But when his mother asked him if he was sure, he ran to her.
"John never forgot the horror of that incident," writes Niezgoda. "It
left a permanent scar and great feelings of insecurity, and nearly 20
years would pass before he would see his father again."
Life with Julia Lennon was no bargain. He was often left home alone
and found it difficult to sleep. Lennon later recalled that she was
"not prostituting for money but rather for silk stockings."
At age 6, Lennon began running away from home to stay with his Aunt
Mimi. He learned which trolleys to take by the quality of the black
leather seats, he explained.
"To this day, I'm fond of black leather," he would say later. "I find
it comforting."
Sometimes he would be picked up by adults concerned for his welfare
and taken to a local police station.
"I could never find the right words to explain my situation," he would
say.
Lennon's troubles continued through schooling – taking little interest
in classroom learning, showing contempt for teachers, skipping class,
smoking and swearing, cheating on exams, stealing candy from other
children and pilfering cigarettes to make money.
He was thrown out of religious chorus for substituting obscene words
in hymns.
Another biographer wrote: "John regularly poked fun at church
dignitaries, parodied hymns and drew blasphemous cartoons of Christ on
the cross in a way that only the once-faithful can."
Perhaps to compensate for his tough childhood, Lennon became consumed
with becoming both rich and famous.
Pete Best recalled how Lennon would say he was going to get to the top
– one way or another.
"If we have to be bent or con people, then that's what we'll have to
do to get there," Best quoted Lennon as saying. "It doesn't matter
what it takes to get to the top. It might cause some heartache, but
once I'm up there, it'll be a different kettle of fish. Yes, he did
say, 'I' and not 'we.' That was the real John Lennon, brilliant,
amusing but ruthless."
Niezgoda cites the unprecedented and unsurpassed "mania" that
surrounded the Beatles as one of the most intriguing clues suggesting
something supernatural about their career.
"John, Paul, George and Ringo were highly talented writers and
musicians – as all too well evidenced by their solo careers," Niezgoda
told WND. "But what was it at the beginning that set them apart from
their contemporaries? What was it that lifted them in a few short
years from utter obscurity to become the greatest show on Earth. When
they traveled to Australia in 1964, what earthly power caused 400,000
fans to gather outside their hotel to merely catch a glimpse of the
four young boys from Liverpool? How does one logically account for 20
number one hit records in a brief period of six years?
"Nothing before or since has come close to equaling the rapid and
widespread emotional pandemic frenzy surrounding the Beatles. I can go
on indefinitely listing their unearthly accomplishments but that is
not providing an explanation for it. Trying to explain the source of
the Beatles fame and fortune is like trying to define magic."
At the peak of their popularity, Beatles fans became obsessed with
what appeared to be clues in their music about a death within the
band. At the time, the focus was on speculation that McCartney had
been killed in a car crash and replaced with a lookalike.
Not even a press conference by Paul could persuade devotees of the
clues that he was, in fact, the real deal. It all seemed silly after
McCartney's long and illustrious solo career took off.
"The suspicion, however, was not without merit," explains Niezgoda.
"The clues were there, and too numerous to be ignored. They just
needed to be viewed through a different lens to create not a picture
of a past conspiracy, but a future tragedy. When examined as a
possible prophecy, the clues appear to be quite clearly not about
Paul, but about John Lennon."
Niezgoda is convinced the Beatles had supernatural help – not only
with their rise to the top, but with these "clues" that seemed so
persuasive that something was not right within the Beatles. He's not
happy about his conclusion. In fact, as a lifelong Beatles fan, he
seems deeply conflicted.
"I have always had to deal with the constant conflict of my love for
their music and the evil that I perceive surrounds it," he told WND.
"The only difference is that I have tried to define or make sense of
it with the help of this book."
I am not saying I agree or disagree here.
Just posting the story
.
.
.
.
.
.
So Paul's talent was just crap then right?
That's hogwash just like the rest of the book.
The sad part is that there are going to be some
runny nosed conspiracy propellorhead religionists
that are going to take this book as Bible and
come to some weird conclusion that Ringo
is the anitxhrist! Get real.
The life that John and Paul lead was pretty rough
and tumble despite their fame and fortune.
These guys, these young guys had talent oozing
out of their pores.
If anything, John Lennon was a bit of a depressed
loner type young man. He eventually broke out of that
because his wife broke him and molded him to become
a man in his own head.
The last album John wrote was nothing but maturity
at it's ...
read more »
No, Studio, you got it all wrong. We only think they have talent
because the devil has made us think they have talent. What is really
being played is a cacophony of random squeaks and squelches and bodily
noises.
2***@name.go
2009-05-16 09:16:25 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 15 May 2009 13:27:08 -0700 (PDT), Papillon
Post by Papillon
Post by studio
Post by H8N S8N
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=97837
Posted: May 14, 2009
8:20 pm Eastern
© 2009 WorldNetDaily
WASHINGTON – The Beatles meteoric rise, unprecedented in popular
culture and unrivaled nearly four decades after the band broke up, is
at least partly explained, says a new book, by a pact John Lennon made
with the Devil.
In "The Lennon Prophecy," author Joseph Niezgoda reveals that Lennon
himself, obsessed with the occult, magic, numerology and being bigger
than Elvis Presley, confided in his friend Tony Sheridan that he made
such a deal. The book also makes the case that the "death clues" long
associated with Paul McCartney were actually subliminal messages
hinting at Lennon's fate.
Written by a lifelong Beatles fan and musician, the book hypothesizes
the pact was made just before the band experienced its first major
successes and ended 20 years later with Lennon's assassination in New
York by Mark David Chapman, who later claimed to have demons exorcized
from him while serving his sentence for murder in Attica State Prison.
"Chapman said that as the last demon left his body he was given the
reason for his possession," Niezgoda told WND. "It was to make a show
of Satan's great power in the world using John Lennon's murder as the
vehicle. I've always held an intuitive belief … that the true author
of this story is Satan and that I am only the messenger."
Get the book that lays out the case for John Lennon's pact with Satan
– "The Lennon Prophecy" by Joseph Niezgoda.
Of course, many will reject the notion that there is a real spirit
called Satan. Others will scoff at the notion that people can make
pacts with him that can result in real-world results.
So Niezgoda devotes a chapter to what may surprise many readers as
fairly well-documented historical Satanic pacts – including the case
of Johann Faust, who, in his Renaissance Age period, achieved fame and
fortune perhaps equal to Lennon and the Beatles four centuries later.
He, too, met an untimely, mysterious and grotesquely inexplicable
death 20 years later.
While Faust boasted of performing more miracles than Jesus Christ,
Lennon created controversy by boasting that his band was more famous
than Jesus Christ.
"If John had entered into a 20-year pact with the Devil for wealth and
world fame, that contract ended on December 8, 1980, with his violent
death," said Niezgoda. "Counting back 20 years, did anything unusual
in Beatles history occur in December 1960?"
In fact, it did, Niezgoda recalls. On Dec. 27, 1960, the Beatles
played the Town Hall Ball Room in Litherland, England.
"It was said that following this single night's performance, the
Beatles never looked back," recalls Niezgoda. "Each of the Beatles
remembers this night as the turning point in their careers."
Immediately following this memorable performance, the Beatles began
playing in Liverpool's Cavern Club, where they became a local
phenomenon. Then they moved on to Hamburg, where German audiences went
wild.
That gig also marked the beginning of Lennon's avowedly anti-Christian
behavior. In the book "The Love You Make" by Peter Brown, he recounts
how Lennon donned a dog collar made of paper, cut out a paper cross
and began preaching to the Hamburg audience – drawing a mocking
picture of Jesus hanging on the cross wearing a pair of bedroom
slippers.
Later, also in Germany, on Good Friday, Lennon targeted a group of
nuns with a life-size effigy of Jesus on the cross hanging from his
balcony.
"As the sisters gazed in astonishment at this sacrilegious display,
biographer Albert Goldman.
Pete Best, the original drummer with the group, also witnessed such
behavior and wrote about it in his own book describing how Lennon
urinated on another group of nuns from his balcony while proclaiming,
"Raindrops from heaven!"
These were just some of the ways Lennon confronted and antagonized
Christian worshippers – for seemingly no reason other than his own
amusement.
The book devotes a full chapter to Lennon's childhood of tragedy,
disappointment and sadness. His mother, Julia, and his father,
Freddie, fought over custody of young John. At 5 years old, he was
forced to decide which parent he would choose. He first chose his
father. But when his mother asked him if he was sure, he ran to her.
"John never forgot the horror of that incident," writes Niezgoda. "It
left a permanent scar and great feelings of insecurity, and nearly 20
years would pass before he would see his father again."
Life with Julia Lennon was no bargain. He was often left home alone
and found it difficult to sleep. Lennon later recalled that she was
"not prostituting for money but rather for silk stockings."
At age 6, Lennon began running away from home to stay with his Aunt
Mimi. He learned which trolleys to take by the quality of the black
leather seats, he explained.
"To this day, I'm fond of black leather," he would say later. "I find
it comforting."
Sometimes he would be picked up by adults concerned for his welfare
and taken to a local police station.
"I could never find the right words to explain my situation," he would
say.
Lennon's troubles continued through schooling – taking little interest
in classroom learning, showing contempt for teachers, skipping class,
smoking and swearing, cheating on exams, stealing candy from other
children and pilfering cigarettes to make money.
He was thrown out of religious chorus for substituting obscene words
in hymns.
Another biographer wrote: "John regularly poked fun at church
dignitaries, parodied hymns and drew blasphemous cartoons of Christ on
the cross in a way that only the once-faithful can."
Perhaps to compensate for his tough childhood, Lennon became consumed
with becoming both rich and famous.
Pete Best recalled how Lennon would say he was going to get to the top
– one way or another.
"If we have to be bent or con people, then that's what we'll have to
do to get there," Best quoted Lennon as saying. "It doesn't matter
what it takes to get to the top. It might cause some heartache, but
once I'm up there, it'll be a different kettle of fish. Yes, he did
say, 'I' and not 'we.' That was the real John Lennon, brilliant,
amusing but ruthless."
Niezgoda cites the unprecedented and unsurpassed "mania" that
surrounded the Beatles as one of the most intriguing clues suggesting
something supernatural about their career.
"John, Paul, George and Ringo were highly talented writers and
musicians – as all too well evidenced by their solo careers," Niezgoda
told WND. "But what was it at the beginning that set them apart from
their contemporaries? What was it that lifted them in a few short
years from utter obscurity to become the greatest show on Earth. When
they traveled to Australia in 1964, what earthly power caused 400,000
fans to gather outside their hotel to merely catch a glimpse of the
four young boys from Liverpool? How does one logically account for 20
number one hit records in a brief period of six years?
"Nothing before or since has come close to equaling the rapid and
widespread emotional pandemic frenzy surrounding the Beatles. I can go
on indefinitely listing their unearthly accomplishments but that is
not providing an explanation for it. Trying to explain the source of
the Beatles fame and fortune is like trying to define magic."
At the peak of their popularity, Beatles fans became obsessed with
what appeared to be clues in their music about a death within the
band. At the time, the focus was on speculation that McCartney had
been killed in a car crash and replaced with a lookalike.
Not even a press conference by Paul could persuade devotees of the
clues that he was, in fact, the real deal. It all seemed silly after
McCartney's long and illustrious solo career took off.
"The suspicion, however, was not without merit," explains Niezgoda.
"The clues were there, and too numerous to be ignored. They just
needed to be viewed through a different lens to create not a picture
of a past conspiracy, but a future tragedy. When examined as a
possible prophecy, the clues appear to be quite clearly not about
Paul, but about John Lennon."
Niezgoda is convinced the Beatles had supernatural help – not only
with their rise to the top, but with these "clues" that seemed so
persuasive that something was not right within the Beatles. He's not
happy about his conclusion. In fact, as a lifelong Beatles fan, he
seems deeply conflicted.
"I have always had to deal with the constant conflict of my love for
their music and the evil that I perceive surrounds it," he told WND.
"The only difference is that I have tried to define or make sense of
it with the help of this book."
I am not saying I agree or disagree here.
Just posting the story
.
.
.
.
.
.
So Paul's talent was just crap then right?
That's hogwash just like the rest of the book.
The sad part is that there are going to be some
runny nosed conspiracy propellorhead religionists
that are going to take this book as Bible and
come to some weird conclusion that Ringo
is the anitxhrist! Get real.
The life that John and Paul lead was pretty rough
and tumble despite their fame and fortune.
These guys, these young guys had talent oozing
out of their pores.
If anything, John Lennon was a bit of a depressed
loner type young man. He eventually broke out of that
because his wife broke him and molded him to become
a man in his own head.
The last album John wrote was nothing but maturity
at it's ...
read more »
No, Studio, you got it all wrong. We only think they have talent
because the devil has made us think they have talent. What is really
being played is a cacophony of random squeaks and squelches and bodily
noises.
Kinda like Satan made Gene Scott sound like The Sermon on the Mount to
his bewitched followers when in reality any Gene Scott "Sir, amen" was
"a cacophony of random squeaks and squelches and bodily noises."
Queefs from Mistress of the Porn Melissa Barbie.
Weatherman
2009-05-16 10:15:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by 2***@name.go
On Fri, 15 May 2009 13:27:08 -0700 (PDT), Papillon
Kinda like Satan made Gene Scott sound like The Sermon on the Mount to
his bewitched followers when in reality any Gene Scott "Sir, amen" was
"a cacophony of random squeaks and squelches and bodily noises."
Queefs from Mistress of the Porn Melissa Barbie.
WM-It was far more complicated than that.
r***@verizon.net
2009-05-16 12:17:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
Post by 2***@name.go
On Fri, 15 May 2009 13:27:08 -0700 (PDT), Papillon
Kinda like Satan made Gene Scott sound like The Sermon on the Mount to
his bewitched followers when in reality any Gene Scott "Sir, amen" was
"a cacophony of random squeaks and squelches and bodily noises."
Queefs from Mistress of the Porn Melissa Barbie.
WM-It was far more complicated than that.
what a crock

must all things unexplained therefore be explained supernaturally?
One day this author got up and said to himself, "Lord S8n, I shall
write a book that will give you even more attention than you already
have."

Author seems more of an agent of S8n than Lennon ever was.

The Church would do well to learn from Lennon's critique/anger/
frustration with the church and its presentation of Jesus (perhaps his
reactions and beliefs had a lot to do with the way Christ was/is
packaged than with a personal rejection of Jesus himself.) "I don't
believe in Jesus," Lennon sings in his song "God Is A Concept (by
which we measure our pain)" .
Yet he also lists a lot of other things that were all seemingly
irrelevant to the real pain he was then experiencing at the time in
his personal life and had experienced and would continue to
experience.

The Church would do well to proclaim Christ Crucified -- an entering
into human pain by God -- war, poverty, isolation, injustice, etc.--
through an everlasting and suffering love, and then INCARNATING that
belief ourselves, as his Body in the world today.

"Chirst, YOU know it ain't easy. YOU know how hard it can be. The
way things are going they're gonna crucify ME."
-- Ballad of John and Yoko.

And ME means ALL of us -- "you too buddy" -- I can envision John
saying to us all.

IMHO there was a definite distinction in Lennon between what he viewed
as the Church's seemingly irrelevant and powerless presentation of
Jesus to/in a world of pain and suffering and what seemed to be
Lennon's own personal view/understanding of who Jesus was and what he
was all about. In some ways, perhaps Lennon was more in touch with
Jesus, the Crucified and Risen Christ than many who claim to 'know"
him in a "personal" way. Far from removing our pain, this Jesus
enters into it and shares it and ULTIMATELY, not MAGICALLY redeems it/
us.

It is a shame that Lennon/Ono seemingly continued to look to majik for
a more immediate protection/removal/redemption from suffering. But to
say that S8n was ultimately responsible is the old "devil made me/him
to it." Maybe the lack of any relevant witness by the Church played
more of a role in that endeavor than any supposed pact with the
devil.

Imagine if that were true, Mr. Author. :-)


At the v
r***@verizon.net
2009-05-16 12:23:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@verizon.net
Post by Weatherman
Post by 2***@name.go
On Fri, 15 May 2009 13:27:08 -0700 (PDT), Papillon
Kinda like Satan made Gene Scott sound like The Sermon on the Mount to
his bewitched followers when in reality any Gene Scott "Sir, amen" was
"a cacophony of random squeaks and squelches and bodily noises."
Queefs from Mistress of the Porn Melissa Barbie.
WM-It was far more complicated than that.
what a crock
must all things unexplained therefore be explained supernaturally?
One day this author got up and said to himself, "Lord S8n, I shall
write a book that will give you even more attention than you already
have."
Author seems more of an agent of S8n than Lennon ever was.
The Church would do well to learn from Lennon's critique/anger/
frustration with the church and its presentation of Jesus (perhaps his
reactions and beliefs had a lot to do with the way Christ was/is
packaged than with a personal rejection of Jesus himself.)   "I don't
believe in Jesus," Lennon sings in his song "God Is A Concept (by
which we measure our pain)" .
Yet he also lists a lot of other things that were all seemingly
irrelevant to the real pain he was then experiencing at the time in
his personal life and had experienced and would continue to
experience.
The Church would do well to proclaim Christ Crucified -- an entering
into human pain by God -- war, poverty, isolation, injustice, etc.--
through an everlasting and suffering love, and then INCARNATING that
belief ourselves, as his Body in the world today.
"Chirst, YOU know it ain't easy.  YOU know how hard it can be.  The
way things are going they're gonna crucify ME."
 -- Ballad of John and Yoko.
 And ME means ALL of us -- "you too buddy" --  I can envision John
saying to us all.
IMHO there was a definite distinction in Lennon between what he viewed
as the Church's seemingly irrelevant and powerless presentation of
Jesus to/in a world of pain and suffering and what seemed to be
Lennon's own personal view/understanding of who Jesus was and what he
was all about.  In some ways, perhaps Lennon was more in touch with
Jesus, the Crucified and Risen Christ than many who claim to 'know"
him in a "personal" way.  Far from removing our pain, this Jesus
enters into it and shares it and ULTIMATELY, not MAGICALLY redeems it/
us.
It is a shame that Lennon/Ono seemingly continued to look to majik for
a more immediate protection/removal/redemption from suffering. But to
say that S8n was ultimately responsible is the old "devil made me/him
do it."  Maybe the lack of any relevant witness by the Church played
more of a role in that endeavor than any supposed pact with the
devil.
Imagine if that were true, Mr. Author.   :-)
oops ... "devil made me/him DO it." (not "to" it) ... duh.
Weatherman
2009-05-16 22:46:18 UTC
Permalink
WM-We may find in the end that it wasn't so much the blatant in your
face satanic stuff that took in the larger masses.

Jerry Lee Lewis it has been said would go into drunken rages in the
studio about how he was playing the devils music. He would even preach
with a bible in his hand to everyone there. His manger would come in
and calm him down, He would eventually start playing.

Now ask yourself, what kind of force could over ride that kind of open
conflict he was having? It was really Lewis and Barry that brought in
the blatant sex R&R to the mainstream. Did Lewis know what he was
doing but couldn't stop himself? Was he governed by a power outside of
himself to strong for him to cope with?
Papillon
2009-05-17 00:47:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Weatherman
WM-We may find in the end that it wasn't so much the blatant in your
face satanic stuff that took in the larger masses.
I think that is a very true statement.
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